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Recent developments in architectural semiotics

Recent developments in architectural semiotics GEOFFREY BROADBENT Background Few architect-semioticians can resist pointing out that one of the first semiotic statements ever to be published occurs in the earliest surviving text on architecture, in which Vitruvius, writing at the time of Christ, says (Chapter 1: 3): all things, but especially in architecture, there are these two points: that which is signified and that which gives it significance'. So it is hardly surprising that once Saussurean Semiology had been developed by Levi-Strauss into Structuralism and applied to the analysis of cultural phenomena in general, there would follow applications of such thinking to architecture. These seem to have been started in Italy in the 1960s by analysts of culture in general, such as Gillo Dorfles, Umberto Eco, and Emilio Garroni, but architects such as Renato de Fusco and Maria-Luisa Scalvini soon began to develop their own applications as architects. Cesar Janello too introduced such studies to Buenos Aires, where a flourishing school was to develop. The Anglo-Saxon world tended to be suspicious of such 'theorizing', but interest began to develop after Jencks and Baird had published their pioneering collection on Meaning in Architecture (1969), after which others set up conferences in this field such as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique de Gruyter

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References (11)

Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0037-1998
eISSN
1613-3692
DOI
10.1515/semi.1994.101.1-2.73
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

GEOFFREY BROADBENT Background Few architect-semioticians can resist pointing out that one of the first semiotic statements ever to be published occurs in the earliest surviving text on architecture, in which Vitruvius, writing at the time of Christ, says (Chapter 1: 3): all things, but especially in architecture, there are these two points: that which is signified and that which gives it significance'. So it is hardly surprising that once Saussurean Semiology had been developed by Levi-Strauss into Structuralism and applied to the analysis of cultural phenomena in general, there would follow applications of such thinking to architecture. These seem to have been started in Italy in the 1960s by analysts of culture in general, such as Gillo Dorfles, Umberto Eco, and Emilio Garroni, but architects such as Renato de Fusco and Maria-Luisa Scalvini soon began to develop their own applications as architects. Cesar Janello too introduced such studies to Buenos Aires, where a flourishing school was to develop. The Anglo-Saxon world tended to be suspicious of such 'theorizing', but interest began to develop after Jencks and Baird had published their pioneering collection on Meaning in Architecture (1969), after which others set up conferences in this field such as

Journal

Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotiquede Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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