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Parathyroid adenoma imaging-preoperative localization

Parathyroid adenoma imaging-preoperative localization ABSTRACT Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a frequent endocrine disorder that can only be cured by a surgical procedure that is parathyroidectomy. The main causes are usually solitary benign adenoma (80-85%), diffuse or nodular hyperplasia (10-15%), or parathyroid carcinoma (<1%). Out of the known localization techniques, ultrasonography, nuclear scintigraphy and computer tomography (CT scan) are most commonly used (1). The aim of this study is to evaluate the sensibility of ultrasonography by comparison to scintigraphy and CT scan for the preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma in patients with biochemically confirmed primary hyperparathyroidism. Localization studies were correlated with intraoperative findings, histopathological outcomes. In a retrospective study we analyzed 60 patients out of 245 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy for PHPT between 2012-2013 in the Surgery Department of the National Institute of Endocrinology, Bucharest. Preoperative evaluation included imaging explorations (ultrasonography, scintigraphy and cervical CT scan) and therapeutic success was confirmed by histopathological result and the evolution of hormonal and biochemical tests. Intraoperative exploration revealed a single adenoma in 59 patients and one double adenoma. Thyroid disease was associated in 27 (45%) patients http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ARS Medica Tomitana de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
1841-4036
eISSN
1841-4036
DOI
10.1515/arsm-2015-0031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a frequent endocrine disorder that can only be cured by a surgical procedure that is parathyroidectomy. The main causes are usually solitary benign adenoma (80-85%), diffuse or nodular hyperplasia (10-15%), or parathyroid carcinoma (<1%). Out of the known localization techniques, ultrasonography, nuclear scintigraphy and computer tomography (CT scan) are most commonly used (1). The aim of this study is to evaluate the sensibility of ultrasonography by comparison to scintigraphy and CT scan for the preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma in patients with biochemically confirmed primary hyperparathyroidism. Localization studies were correlated with intraoperative findings, histopathological outcomes. In a retrospective study we analyzed 60 patients out of 245 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy for PHPT between 2012-2013 in the Surgery Department of the National Institute of Endocrinology, Bucharest. Preoperative evaluation included imaging explorations (ultrasonography, scintigraphy and cervical CT scan) and therapeutic success was confirmed by histopathological result and the evolution of hormonal and biochemical tests. Intraoperative exploration revealed a single adenoma in 59 patients and one double adenoma. Thyroid disease was associated in 27 (45%) patients

Journal

ARS Medica Tomitanade Gruyter

Published: Aug 1, 2015

References