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‘One Does Everything to Make Life Better.’ Petty Corruption and Its Legal Implications in Hungary

‘One Does Everything to Make Life Better.’ Petty Corruption and Its Legal Implications in Hungary AbstractCombining research into the law with the conceptual framework offered by legal anthropology contributes to a more thorough understanding of how individuals experience corruption and anti-corruption legislation. Interviews with elderly Hungarians allow a deeper understanding of traditions and individual behaviour that influence the implementation of anti-corruption law. Informal payments in health care, in the realm of petty or everyday corruption, have become social traditions based on a general faith in their ability to organize and determine social and individual relations. At the same time, they have turned out to be exceptional challenges as far as their legal adjudication is concerned, as individuals are keen to find stability and reliability in norms, traditions and personal relationships outside the scope of the law. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Südosteuropa de Gruyter

‘One Does Everything to Make Life Better.’ Petty Corruption and Its Legal Implications in Hungary

Südosteuropa , Volume 66 (3): 22 – Sep 25, 2018

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
0722-480X
eISSN
2364-933X
DOI
10.1515/soeu-2018-0028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractCombining research into the law with the conceptual framework offered by legal anthropology contributes to a more thorough understanding of how individuals experience corruption and anti-corruption legislation. Interviews with elderly Hungarians allow a deeper understanding of traditions and individual behaviour that influence the implementation of anti-corruption law. Informal payments in health care, in the realm of petty or everyday corruption, have become social traditions based on a general faith in their ability to organize and determine social and individual relations. At the same time, they have turned out to be exceptional challenges as far as their legal adjudication is concerned, as individuals are keen to find stability and reliability in norms, traditions and personal relationships outside the scope of the law.

Journal

Südosteuropade Gruyter

Published: Sep 25, 2018

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