Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Not All Past is Legacy: Echoes of 1917–1923 in Contemporary East Central Europe

Not All Past is Legacy: Echoes of 1917–1923 in Contemporary East Central Europe AbstractThe article discusses parallelisms between the social and political realities of East Central Europe around 1917–1923 and the current state of affairs. It starts with an analysis of the dynamic social relations in the final year of the Great War to follow with the question of their impact on politics and a short outline of the region’s history after 1918. While in terms of political and social reality there is little to invite comparison between these two periods under scrutiny, the language of politics and popular sentiments do. Most importantly, and similarly to East Central Europe in the interwar period, fear of a radical change (be it Bolshevism as in 1917–1923 or the cultural revolution) is the main tool of conservative mobilization which represents the sole actual danger to the existing social and political order. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Baltic Journal of European Studies de Gruyter

Not All Past is Legacy: Echoes of 1917–1923 in Contemporary East Central Europe

Baltic Journal of European Studies , Volume 11 (1): 14 – May 1, 2021

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/not-all-past-is-legacy-echoes-of-1917-1923-in-contemporary-east-O2Plex0MIP
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2021 Maciej Górny, published by Sciendo
ISSN
2228-0596
eISSN
2674-4619
DOI
10.2478/bjes-2021-0004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe article discusses parallelisms between the social and political realities of East Central Europe around 1917–1923 and the current state of affairs. It starts with an analysis of the dynamic social relations in the final year of the Great War to follow with the question of their impact on politics and a short outline of the region’s history after 1918. While in terms of political and social reality there is little to invite comparison between these two periods under scrutiny, the language of politics and popular sentiments do. Most importantly, and similarly to East Central Europe in the interwar period, fear of a radical change (be it Bolshevism as in 1917–1923 or the cultural revolution) is the main tool of conservative mobilization which represents the sole actual danger to the existing social and political order.

Journal

Baltic Journal of European Studiesde Gruyter

Published: May 1, 2021

Keywords: independence; moral economy; political radicalism; social change; strike

There are no references for this article.