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Mennonite Martyrs and Multimedia: On the Form and Function of Intermediality in Reformation Communication

Mennonite Martyrs and Multimedia: On the Form and Function of Intermediality in Reformation... Mennonite Martyrs and Multimedia: On the Form and Function of Intermediality in Reformation Communication By Louise Vermeersch In August 1566, chronicle writer Marcus Van Vaernewijck noticed the vigor withwhichayoungmandebatedaCalvinistpreacherduringoneoftheillegal hedge-preachingsinGhent.VanVaernewijckidentifiedthemanasanAnabap- tist. Anabaptists, he continued, were known for their clever debating tricks, a skill they had mastered because they were inspired by the arguments in the lettersandsongsthathadbeenwrittenbyimprisonedandeventuallyexecuted Anabaptists. Most of these texts were compiled in the martyrology entitled Het Offer des Heeren (hereafter abbreviated as ODH). The popularity of this compilationsuggests that printed communicationplayedan important role in the dissemination of Anabaptist ideas. Yet Van Vaernewijck’s comment illus- trateshowthecontentofthoseprintedtextsalsoreachedcitizensthroughcom- plexprocessesofmedialinteractions.Theprintedcontentwasnotsimplyread, it was also circulated and mediated through oral and performative communi- cation.Mostofthescholarshipontheseprintedmartyrtextshasfocusedonthe theologicalmessageofthetextitself,butsincethenon-textualcommunication and iteration of the ideas within the text were at least as important as the text itself,thisarticleseekstoanalyzetheformandfunctionsofthosemedialinter- actionsintheurbancontextofGhent.Its centralargumentisthatthecontent of early modern print must be analyzed as both the result and the subject of 1. I would like to thank my doctoral advisor Professor Anne-Laure Van Bruaene and Professor Ute Lotz-Heumann for their comments on this text. See my unpublished Ph.D. thesis for a more detailed discussion of multimediality in the urban public sphere. Louise Vermeersch,“Multimediaindestad:interactiestussenhetgeschreven,gedrukteengesproken woord in de Gentse publieke sfeer (1550–1585)” (PhD thesis, Ghent University, 2019). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

Mennonite Martyrs and Multimedia: On the Form and Function of Intermediality in Reformation Communication

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2020 by Gütersloher Verlagshaus
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2020-1110109
Publisher site
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Abstract

Mennonite Martyrs and Multimedia: On the Form and Function of Intermediality in Reformation Communication By Louise Vermeersch In August 1566, chronicle writer Marcus Van Vaernewijck noticed the vigor withwhichayoungmandebatedaCalvinistpreacherduringoneoftheillegal hedge-preachingsinGhent.VanVaernewijckidentifiedthemanasanAnabap- tist. Anabaptists, he continued, were known for their clever debating tricks, a skill they had mastered because they were inspired by the arguments in the lettersandsongsthathadbeenwrittenbyimprisonedandeventuallyexecuted Anabaptists. Most of these texts were compiled in the martyrology entitled Het Offer des Heeren (hereafter abbreviated as ODH). The popularity of this compilationsuggests that printed communicationplayedan important role in the dissemination of Anabaptist ideas. Yet Van Vaernewijck’s comment illus- trateshowthecontentofthoseprintedtextsalsoreachedcitizensthroughcom- plexprocessesofmedialinteractions.Theprintedcontentwasnotsimplyread, it was also circulated and mediated through oral and performative communi- cation.Mostofthescholarshipontheseprintedmartyrtextshasfocusedonthe theologicalmessageofthetextitself,butsincethenon-textualcommunication and iteration of the ideas within the text were at least as important as the text itself,thisarticleseekstoanalyzetheformandfunctionsofthosemedialinter- actionsintheurbancontextofGhent.Its centralargumentisthatthecontent of early modern print must be analyzed as both the result and the subject of 1. I would like to thank my doctoral advisor Professor Anne-Laure Van Bruaene and Professor Ute Lotz-Heumann for their comments on this text. See my unpublished Ph.D. thesis for a more detailed discussion of multimediality in the urban public sphere. Louise Vermeersch,“Multimediaindestad:interactiestussenhetgeschreven,gedrukteengesproken woord in de Gentse publieke sfeer (1550–1585)” (PhD thesis, Ghent University, 2019).

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2020

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