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Martin Luther, Home-Boy, Looks Outward*

Martin Luther, Home-Boy, Looks Outward* Martin Luther, Home-Boy, Looks Outward*By Susan C. Karant-NunnIn the Reformation era, Europe was confronting the world beyond its boundaries.Particularly among those colleagues who have studied at institutions where theyear 1500 remains the great dividing line between an old-fashioned past and anemerging modern world, awareness may be less of the extent to which medievaltraders, military men, clerics, and intellectuals were already reaching across theboundaries we assign to Europe within the Eurasian continent. This process begins not later than 1100. In the fifteenth century, to be sure, the intensificationand diversification of exchange is visible. We know that this did, in time, alterEuropean culture, especially in the great trading cities through which artifacts andideas were prone to flow. But other trends were setting in that had only a slenderconnection to the outside world, and the Lutheran Reformation was one of these.Luther’s world was circumscribed to an extent that, say, that of the mercantileDutch followers of John Calvin could not be.Martin Luther knew that he was Thuringian. His homeland was Mansfeld –the County of Mansfeld – and he was a little pleased when he found that he wasgoing to die there. He also knew that he adopted the Saxon German of the elector’schancery http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 by Gütersloher Verlagshaus
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2017-0111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Martin Luther, Home-Boy, Looks Outward*By Susan C. Karant-NunnIn the Reformation era, Europe was confronting the world beyond its boundaries.Particularly among those colleagues who have studied at institutions where theyear 1500 remains the great dividing line between an old-fashioned past and anemerging modern world, awareness may be less of the extent to which medievaltraders, military men, clerics, and intellectuals were already reaching across theboundaries we assign to Europe within the Eurasian continent. This process begins not later than 1100. In the fifteenth century, to be sure, the intensificationand diversification of exchange is visible. We know that this did, in time, alterEuropean culture, especially in the great trading cities through which artifacts andideas were prone to flow. But other trends were setting in that had only a slenderconnection to the outside world, and the Lutheran Reformation was one of these.Luther’s world was circumscribed to an extent that, say, that of the mercantileDutch followers of John Calvin could not be.Martin Luther knew that he was Thuringian. His homeland was Mansfeld –the County of Mansfeld – and he was a little pleased when he found that he wasgoing to die there. He also knew that he adopted the Saxon German of the elector’schancery

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 26, 2017

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