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Letting English Words Stand: Thomas More, William Tyndale and the Common Expression of English Theology

Letting English Words Stand: Thomas More, William Tyndale and the Common Expression of English... By Jan James Martin In 1532, the first half of the Confutacyon of Tyndale's answere made by syr Thomas More knight lord chauncellour of England was published. The second half followed a year later, though by that time More (1478­1535) had resigned as Chancellor because it became increasingly difficult for him to support Henry VIII's religious policies. 1 The Confutacyon, half a million words in length, was More's second publication in a written debate with William Tyndale (c.1494­ 1536) that began in 1529 when More published A Dyaloge concerning heresies. In the Dyaloge, More discussed "the veneracyon & worshyp of ymagys & relyques / prayng to saynts / & goynge on pylgrymage." He also addressed "many other thyngys touching the pestilent secte of Luther & Tyndale," particularly Tyndale's English translation of the New Testament. 2 Tyndale responded to the Dyaloge with An Answere unto Sir Thomas More (1531). In the Answere, Tyndale defended his New Testament and his theology. The Confutacyon was More's response to Tyndale's Answere. With some irony, considering the length of the Confutacyon and its purpose, More protested that the heretics were seeking "to wery all wryters at last wyth endlesse and importune babelynge, & http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

Letting English Words Stand: Thomas More, William Tyndale and the Common Expression of English Theology

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
2198-0489
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2015-0105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By Jan James Martin In 1532, the first half of the Confutacyon of Tyndale's answere made by syr Thomas More knight lord chauncellour of England was published. The second half followed a year later, though by that time More (1478­1535) had resigned as Chancellor because it became increasingly difficult for him to support Henry VIII's religious policies. 1 The Confutacyon, half a million words in length, was More's second publication in a written debate with William Tyndale (c.1494­ 1536) that began in 1529 when More published A Dyaloge concerning heresies. In the Dyaloge, More discussed "the veneracyon & worshyp of ymagys & relyques / prayng to saynts / & goynge on pylgrymage." He also addressed "many other thyngys touching the pestilent secte of Luther & Tyndale," particularly Tyndale's English translation of the New Testament. 2 Tyndale responded to the Dyaloge with An Answere unto Sir Thomas More (1531). In the Answere, Tyndale defended his New Testament and his theology. The Confutacyon was More's response to Tyndale's Answere. With some irony, considering the length of the Confutacyon and its purpose, More protested that the heretics were seeking "to wery all wryters at last wyth endlesse and importune babelynge, &

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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