Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Johann Gerhard’s Transitional Concept of Theologia

Johann Gerhard’s Transitional Concept of Theologia By Glenn K. Fluegge I. INTRODUCTION Students of seventeenth century Lutheran history often find themselves in a quan - dary when they encounter Johann Gerhard (1582–1637). On the one hand, they are told that after Martin Luther (1483–1546) and Martin Chemnitz (1522– 1586), Gerhard is to be recognized as the third preeminent theologian of the Lu - theran Reformation. On the other hand, they are confronted by a wide range of interpretations from those labeling him as “dead orthodoxist” to those promoting him as “proto-pietist.” The truth of the matter is that this wide variance of views is due in large part to the fact that Gerhard is a man between eras, a bridge of sorts between the first and second waves of “orthodoxy,” who possessed a certain pro - clivity for integrating the old with the new, faithful to the legacy of the reformers, yet responsive to contemporary concerns. Such a scenario calls for a careful reading and close analysis of the texts produced by Gerhard in order to more accurately define his theological views, more precisely situate him in the existing historio - * This essay presents some of the research of and is adapted from the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

Johann Gerhard’s Transitional Concept of Theologia

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/johann-gerhard-s-transitional-concept-of-theologia-0HM0MBT6hu
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 by Gütersloher Verlagshaus
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2018-1090108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By Glenn K. Fluegge I. INTRODUCTION Students of seventeenth century Lutheran history often find themselves in a quan - dary when they encounter Johann Gerhard (1582–1637). On the one hand, they are told that after Martin Luther (1483–1546) and Martin Chemnitz (1522– 1586), Gerhard is to be recognized as the third preeminent theologian of the Lu - theran Reformation. On the other hand, they are confronted by a wide range of interpretations from those labeling him as “dead orthodoxist” to those promoting him as “proto-pietist.” The truth of the matter is that this wide variance of views is due in large part to the fact that Gerhard is a man between eras, a bridge of sorts between the first and second waves of “orthodoxy,” who possessed a certain pro - clivity for integrating the old with the new, faithful to the legacy of the reformers, yet responsive to contemporary concerns. Such a scenario calls for a careful reading and close analysis of the texts produced by Gerhard in order to more accurately define his theological views, more precisely situate him in the existing historio - * This essay presents some of the research of and is adapted from the

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Sep 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.