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Jewish Mysticism and Morality: Kabbalah and its Ontological Dualities

Jewish Mysticism and Morality: Kabbalah and its Ontological Dualities Jewish Mysticism and Morality: Kabbalah and its Ontological Dualities Jerome Gellman Introduction In addressing Jewish mysticism and morality, I will be confining myself to the major historical phenomenon of Jewish mysticism, the kabbalah. Having its th roots in earlier mysticism, kabbalah flourished in the 13 century in the Gerona school of mysticism and with the appearance of the Book of the Zohar, ascribed by tradition to the second century Rabbi Shimon Bar Yohai, but attributed by scholars to Moses de Leone, of Granada. It reached its most creative expression th in Safed, Palestine, in the 16 century, in the mysticism of Rabbi Isaac Luria and his pupils and associates. It then flowed into the Hasidic movement starting th in the 18 century, and continues to be studied and cultivated down to our day. Henceforth, when I refer simply to “Jewish mysticism” I will mean that chief form of mysticism in Judaism. I will be using the term “mysticism,” to refer first to unitive experiences, monistic, theistic, nature mysticism, or whatever, involving a phenomenological de-emphasis, blurring, or eradication of multiplicity. For example, in monistic mysticism, all (or almost all) distinctions disappear; in theistic mysticism, some form of union blurs the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Religionsgeschichte de Gruyter

Jewish Mysticism and Morality: Kabbalah and its Ontological Dualities

Archiv für Religionsgeschichte , Volume 9 (1): 14 – Dec 18, 2007

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag GmbH, Rosenheimer Str. 145, 81671 München
ISSN
1868-8888
eISSN
1868-8888
DOI
10.1515/9783110198737.1.23
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jewish Mysticism and Morality: Kabbalah and its Ontological Dualities Jerome Gellman Introduction In addressing Jewish mysticism and morality, I will be confining myself to the major historical phenomenon of Jewish mysticism, the kabbalah. Having its th roots in earlier mysticism, kabbalah flourished in the 13 century in the Gerona school of mysticism and with the appearance of the Book of the Zohar, ascribed by tradition to the second century Rabbi Shimon Bar Yohai, but attributed by scholars to Moses de Leone, of Granada. It reached its most creative expression th in Safed, Palestine, in the 16 century, in the mysticism of Rabbi Isaac Luria and his pupils and associates. It then flowed into the Hasidic movement starting th in the 18 century, and continues to be studied and cultivated down to our day. Henceforth, when I refer simply to “Jewish mysticism” I will mean that chief form of mysticism in Judaism. I will be using the term “mysticism,” to refer first to unitive experiences, monistic, theistic, nature mysticism, or whatever, involving a phenomenological de-emphasis, blurring, or eradication of multiplicity. For example, in monistic mysticism, all (or almost all) distinctions disappear; in theistic mysticism, some form of union blurs the

Journal

Archiv für Religionsgeschichtede Gruyter

Published: Dec 18, 2007

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