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Jewish Immigrants in Vienna before the First World War

Jewish Immigrants in Vienna before the First World War ASCHKENAS ­ Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur der Juden 17/2007, H. 1 Marsha L. Rozenblit Vienna was enormously attractive to generations of Central European Jews who chose to move there in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Despite suffering the problems of all major cities ­ terribly overcrowded housing, rampant disease, higher child mortality rates, social dislocation, anomie ­ Vienna offered economic opportunities that were simply unavailable in the small towns or medium sized cities of the provinces.1 Despite the antisemitism for which Vienna was famous ­ after all, in 1895 a majority of voters supported the antisemitic Christian Social Party, and the party maintained its overwhelming majority until universal suffrage in 1919 changed the situation forever ­ despite this antisemitism, Vienna proved irresistible to tens of thousands of Jews who flocked there as soon as anti-Jewish restrictions were lifted during the Revolution of 1848. Jewish migration began in the 1850s, swelled in the 1860s and 70s, and grew larger still in the antisemitic 1880s, '90s, early 1900s, reaching new heights during the difficult years of the First World War. Antisemitism may have existed, but it proved no deterrent for Jews who wanted what the Weltstadt had to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aschkenas de Gruyter

Jewish Immigrants in Vienna before the First World War

Aschkenas , Volume 17 (1) – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by the
ISSN
1016-4987
eISSN
1865-9438
DOI
10.1515/ASCH.2009.35
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ASCHKENAS ­ Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur der Juden 17/2007, H. 1 Marsha L. Rozenblit Vienna was enormously attractive to generations of Central European Jews who chose to move there in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Despite suffering the problems of all major cities ­ terribly overcrowded housing, rampant disease, higher child mortality rates, social dislocation, anomie ­ Vienna offered economic opportunities that were simply unavailable in the small towns or medium sized cities of the provinces.1 Despite the antisemitism for which Vienna was famous ­ after all, in 1895 a majority of voters supported the antisemitic Christian Social Party, and the party maintained its overwhelming majority until universal suffrage in 1919 changed the situation forever ­ despite this antisemitism, Vienna proved irresistible to tens of thousands of Jews who flocked there as soon as anti-Jewish restrictions were lifted during the Revolution of 1848. Jewish migration began in the 1850s, swelled in the 1860s and 70s, and grew larger still in the antisemitic 1880s, '90s, early 1900s, reaching new heights during the difficult years of the First World War. Antisemitism may have existed, but it proved no deterrent for Jews who wanted what the Weltstadt had to

Journal

Aschkenasde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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