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Hemangioma of the uvula: the most frequent vascular tumor with a rare localization - Case report with literature review

Hemangioma of the uvula: the most frequent vascular tumor with a rare localization - Case report... AbstractHemangioma is the most common tumor of the vascular origin, benign, frequently observed in children, and with preference for head and neck, but rarely having a uvular origin. In this organ, it presents potential risk of local trauma, hemorrhage and it may produce great discomfort for the patient. In this article we present the cases of two patients (34 year-old and 44-year old) with uvular hemangiomas; patient 1 was admitted for dysphagia, salivation and choking and patient 2 was admitted for the swelling of the uvula, dysphagia, salivation and difficulty in speaking. They both presented a history of this symptoms, with acute episodes of dysphagia. They did not report bleeding, pain or fever. Hemangiomas were histopathologically confirmed, thus raising the awareness that hemangiomas are included in the differential diagnosis when a patient presents an elongated, swollen uvula or uvular masses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ARS Medica Tomitana de Gruyter

Hemangioma of the uvula: the most frequent vascular tumor with a rare localization - Case report with literature review

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Maiorean Alexandra et al., published by De Gruyter Open
ISSN
1841-4036
eISSN
1841-4036
DOI
10.1515/arsm-2016-0036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractHemangioma is the most common tumor of the vascular origin, benign, frequently observed in children, and with preference for head and neck, but rarely having a uvular origin. In this organ, it presents potential risk of local trauma, hemorrhage and it may produce great discomfort for the patient. In this article we present the cases of two patients (34 year-old and 44-year old) with uvular hemangiomas; patient 1 was admitted for dysphagia, salivation and choking and patient 2 was admitted for the swelling of the uvula, dysphagia, salivation and difficulty in speaking. They both presented a history of this symptoms, with acute episodes of dysphagia. They did not report bleeding, pain or fever. Hemangiomas were histopathologically confirmed, thus raising the awareness that hemangiomas are included in the differential diagnosis when a patient presents an elongated, swollen uvula or uvular masses.

Journal

ARS Medica Tomitanade Gruyter

Published: Nov 1, 2016

References