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Gradient clash, faithfulness, and sonority sequencing effects in Russian compound stress

Gradient clash, faithfulness, and sonority sequencing effects in Russian compound stress Abstract Russian normally does not have secondary stress, but it is variably realized in compounds. We examined the factors that contribute to secondary stress realization in a rating study, where listeners were asked to rate compounds pronounced without secondary stress and with secondary stress in various locations. We refine some generalizations from impressionistic descriptions: in compounds whose left-hand stems have mobile lexical stress, acceptability of secondary stress decreases with token frequency of the compound, and acceptability of pronunciations without stress increases with frequency. Ratings improve as distance between stresses increases, and this effect is gradient rather than categorical. We also identify new generalizations about secondary stress that relates to the properties of the left-hand stem. First, we identify a faithfulness effect: stress realization is optional on lexically stressed stems, but stress movement is strongly penalized. Second, we identify a sonority sequencing effect: secondary stress is not tolerated well on linker vowels in compounds, but acceptability improves significantly when the linker is the only vowel in a stem with a falling sonority cluster. Thus, the stress system distinguishes clusters with falling sonority from other types. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Laboratory Phonology de Gruyter

Gradient clash, faithfulness, and sonority sequencing effects in Russian compound stress

Laboratory Phonology , Volume 4 (2) – Oct 25, 2013

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the
ISSN
1868-6346
eISSN
1868-6354
DOI
10.1515/lp-2013-0013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Russian normally does not have secondary stress, but it is variably realized in compounds. We examined the factors that contribute to secondary stress realization in a rating study, where listeners were asked to rate compounds pronounced without secondary stress and with secondary stress in various locations. We refine some generalizations from impressionistic descriptions: in compounds whose left-hand stems have mobile lexical stress, acceptability of secondary stress decreases with token frequency of the compound, and acceptability of pronunciations without stress increases with frequency. Ratings improve as distance between stresses increases, and this effect is gradient rather than categorical. We also identify new generalizations about secondary stress that relates to the properties of the left-hand stem. First, we identify a faithfulness effect: stress realization is optional on lexically stressed stems, but stress movement is strongly penalized. Second, we identify a sonority sequencing effect: secondary stress is not tolerated well on linker vowels in compounds, but acceptability improves significantly when the linker is the only vowel in a stem with a falling sonority cluster. Thus, the stress system distinguishes clusters with falling sonority from other types.

Journal

Laboratory Phonologyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 25, 2013

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