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Geneva and the Myth of the Escalade

Geneva and the Myth of the Escalade By Karin By the first years of the seventeenth century, the city of Geneva was going downhill. Following the heyday of John Calvin's leadership and Geneva's central role as a place of refuge and reference point for Huguenots during the French wars of religion from the 1560s to the 1590s, the city lost prominence as peace returned to France and other Reformed areas across Europe. By 1600, Reformed churches outside Geneva were coming into their own, setting up their own academies and training centers for pastors, and consolidating their own governance structures with little reference to Geneva. At the same time, the city was under increasing pressure from Catholic religious orders and clergy who were busily making Catholicism more attractive to the rural areas outside Geneva and drawing the populations there away from the Reformed faith. Yet Geneva did not quietly fade into obscurity. In fact, the Genevan church and state deliberately made use of one particular event, the failed military assault on the city by Catholic Savoy in December 1602, to reassert the city's central place in the Reformed story. In letters and published accounts, the Genevans gave a highly providential account of the events and their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
2198-0489
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2015-0110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By Karin By the first years of the seventeenth century, the city of Geneva was going downhill. Following the heyday of John Calvin's leadership and Geneva's central role as a place of refuge and reference point for Huguenots during the French wars of religion from the 1560s to the 1590s, the city lost prominence as peace returned to France and other Reformed areas across Europe. By 1600, Reformed churches outside Geneva were coming into their own, setting up their own academies and training centers for pastors, and consolidating their own governance structures with little reference to Geneva. At the same time, the city was under increasing pressure from Catholic religious orders and clergy who were busily making Catholicism more attractive to the rural areas outside Geneva and drawing the populations there away from the Reformed faith. Yet Geneva did not quietly fade into obscurity. In fact, the Genevan church and state deliberately made use of one particular event, the failed military assault on the city by Catholic Savoy in December 1602, to reassert the city's central place in the Reformed story. In letters and published accounts, the Genevans gave a highly providential account of the events and their

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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