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Gender (In)equality and Gender Politics in Southeastern Europe. A Question of Justice

Gender (In)equality and Gender Politics in Southeastern Europe. A Question of Justice In the years since the end of state socialism in Europe, an ambivalent picture of democratisation has emerged in the new or renewed nation-states that resulted from the break-up of Yugoslavia, having separated from Russia’s influence or, in the Albanian case, having opened its borders. While main- and malestream social scientists and historians mostly ignored the gendered character of this transformation process, from the very beginning feminist and gender theorists pointed at the backlash experienced by women some forty-five (in Russia seventy) years after the arrival of socialism’s emancipatory politics. Two decades of controversial debates about the impact of the postsocialist condition on women and gender relations left neither the victimisation of women nor Western valuations of women’s situation under socialism (emancipated but state-dependent) unquestioned. What now remains evident is that the elites of the postsocialist states were mostly male and that gender issues weren’t part of the political agenda, which focused on privatising state property and building up a (liberal) democratic political system and a market-based economy.Christine Hassenstab, one of the editors of the book under review, therefore aptly titles her introduction ‘Never the “Right” Time’ (3-16), alluding to the notorious male argument that political questions other than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Südosteuropa de Gruyter

Gender (In)equality and Gender Politics in Southeastern Europe. A Question of Justice

Südosteuropa , Volume 65 (3): 5 – Sep 26, 2017

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
0722-480X
eISSN
2364-933X
DOI
10.1515/soeu-2017-0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the years since the end of state socialism in Europe, an ambivalent picture of democratisation has emerged in the new or renewed nation-states that resulted from the break-up of Yugoslavia, having separated from Russia’s influence or, in the Albanian case, having opened its borders. While main- and malestream social scientists and historians mostly ignored the gendered character of this transformation process, from the very beginning feminist and gender theorists pointed at the backlash experienced by women some forty-five (in Russia seventy) years after the arrival of socialism’s emancipatory politics. Two decades of controversial debates about the impact of the postsocialist condition on women and gender relations left neither the victimisation of women nor Western valuations of women’s situation under socialism (emancipated but state-dependent) unquestioned. What now remains evident is that the elites of the postsocialist states were mostly male and that gender issues weren’t part of the political agenda, which focused on privatising state property and building up a (liberal) democratic political system and a market-based economy.Christine Hassenstab, one of the editors of the book under review, therefore aptly titles her introduction ‘Never the “Right” Time’ (3-16), alluding to the notorious male argument that political questions other than

Journal

Südosteuropade Gruyter

Published: Sep 26, 2017

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