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From the Editor

From the Editor In this issue of Preservation, Digital Technology & Culture, readers will find several articles of interest to those in the preservation and conservation fields. Topics include how to balance preservation and access requirements in the stewardship of manuscript material, the nature and scope of recent literature on digitization and management of digitized assets, and how academic libraries are using social media to promote preservation awareness.In our first feature, authors Fakhriati Fakhriati, Mu’jizah Mu’jizah, Munawar Holil, and Tedi Permadi, consider the current state of preservation and access to Indonesian manuscripts (“Don’t Leave Indonesian Manuscripts in Danger: An Analysis of Digitisation and Preservation”). The article provides an overview of manuscript collections in need of preservation and digitization activities within Indonesia at national and international institutions. The authors found that although digitization aims to increase availability of these manuscripts, it does not always result in increased use. Digitization may also lead to fewer resources being devoted to physical preservation of the materials. The article encourages institutions to not neglect physical preservation needs when providing increased access through digitization.Sasmita Patra and Jyotshna Sahoo, authors of the second article in this issue, review the ever-growing literature on digitization in libraries. Important subcategories considered in this review include publications and reports relating to selection, acquisition, conversion, metadata creation, storage, long-term access, and management of digitization processes. As part of their review, the authors include 56 full papers published between 2010 and 2019 on different aspects of digitization and digital libraries. Major issues and challenges covered in this literature include budgetary issues, diversity in types and quantity of digitized material, labour and efficiency concerns, document security, quality control, information retrieval, and manipulation of metadata.The final article in this issue, authored by Yeni Budi Rachman, considers the role of social media in promoting and debating conservation and preservation issues (“Through the Lens of Instagram: Library Preservation and Conservation Issues”). Rachman presents a statistical study of Instagram posts that mention library preservation and conservation issues, with the goal of creating a classification scheme for such posts and documenting their frequency. Rachman aims to assess the patterns of dissemination found in academic libraries’ Instagram content and consider how influential social media can be in communicating preservation and conservation activities and concerns.In addition to our feature articles, this issue includes a review by Jonathan Lawler of Libraries, Archives, and Museums: An Introduction to Cultural Heritage Institutions through the Ages, edited by Suzanne L. Stauffer and published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2021. Stauffer’s compilation aims to orient readers to the history of these institutions and explore how they have been shaped by people, geography, and sociopolitical currents of the time. In his review, Lawler points out the challenges of doing a work of this scope and notes some inconsistences and gaps but finds value in the work overall given the lack of scholarly work that broadly considers libraries, archives, and museums together rather than just focusing on one type of institution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Preservation, Digital Technology & Culture (PDT&C) de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2022 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2195-2965
eISSN
2195-2965
DOI
10.1515/pdtc-2022-0006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of Preservation, Digital Technology & Culture, readers will find several articles of interest to those in the preservation and conservation fields. Topics include how to balance preservation and access requirements in the stewardship of manuscript material, the nature and scope of recent literature on digitization and management of digitized assets, and how academic libraries are using social media to promote preservation awareness.In our first feature, authors Fakhriati Fakhriati, Mu’jizah Mu’jizah, Munawar Holil, and Tedi Permadi, consider the current state of preservation and access to Indonesian manuscripts (“Don’t Leave Indonesian Manuscripts in Danger: An Analysis of Digitisation and Preservation”). The article provides an overview of manuscript collections in need of preservation and digitization activities within Indonesia at national and international institutions. The authors found that although digitization aims to increase availability of these manuscripts, it does not always result in increased use. Digitization may also lead to fewer resources being devoted to physical preservation of the materials. The article encourages institutions to not neglect physical preservation needs when providing increased access through digitization.Sasmita Patra and Jyotshna Sahoo, authors of the second article in this issue, review the ever-growing literature on digitization in libraries. Important subcategories considered in this review include publications and reports relating to selection, acquisition, conversion, metadata creation, storage, long-term access, and management of digitization processes. As part of their review, the authors include 56 full papers published between 2010 and 2019 on different aspects of digitization and digital libraries. Major issues and challenges covered in this literature include budgetary issues, diversity in types and quantity of digitized material, labour and efficiency concerns, document security, quality control, information retrieval, and manipulation of metadata.The final article in this issue, authored by Yeni Budi Rachman, considers the role of social media in promoting and debating conservation and preservation issues (“Through the Lens of Instagram: Library Preservation and Conservation Issues”). Rachman presents a statistical study of Instagram posts that mention library preservation and conservation issues, with the goal of creating a classification scheme for such posts and documenting their frequency. Rachman aims to assess the patterns of dissemination found in academic libraries’ Instagram content and consider how influential social media can be in communicating preservation and conservation activities and concerns.In addition to our feature articles, this issue includes a review by Jonathan Lawler of Libraries, Archives, and Museums: An Introduction to Cultural Heritage Institutions through the Ages, edited by Suzanne L. Stauffer and published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2021. Stauffer’s compilation aims to orient readers to the history of these institutions and explore how they have been shaped by people, geography, and sociopolitical currents of the time. In his review, Lawler points out the challenges of doing a work of this scope and notes some inconsistences and gaps but finds value in the work overall given the lack of scholarly work that broadly considers libraries, archives, and museums together rather than just focusing on one type of institution.

Journal

Preservation, Digital Technology & Culture (PDT&C)de Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2022

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