Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Form(ulat)ing Mistrust in the State in the 1990s’ Slovak Live-Action Films

Form(ulat)ing Mistrust in the State in the 1990s’ Slovak Live-Action Films AbstractThe text deals with the ways in which Slovak live-action films made in the 1990s introduced the topic of mistrust in the State and in its institutions. Using specific examples, the text demonstrates that such mistrust was not primarily a critical attitude, but rather consisted of two basic forms of rejection. On the one hand, live-action films made for cinema often promoted the post-modern principle of a “relative” truth, presenting a lifestyle with minimal ties to the State, sometimes also formulating a mistrust in specific state institutions (the police, state-run artistic institutions, education system) by means of irony. On the other hand, films made for state television frequently drew attention to corruption in state organisations and the fact it was usually being generally accepted as a status that did not need to be analysed. In both cases, the message of the 1990s was carried onto the next millennium, and can eventually be interpreted as a way of solidifying the discourse of mistrust that we perceive in contemporary Slovak film for cinemas and television. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Slovenske divadlo /The Slovak Theatre de Gruyter

Form(ulat)ing Mistrust in the State in the 1990s’ Slovak Live-Action Films

Slovenske divadlo /The Slovak Theatre , Volume 65 (3): 14 – Sep 1, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/form-ulat-ing-mistrust-in-the-state-in-the-1990s-slovak-live-action-f4D6kYVMog
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Jana Dudková, published by De Gruyter Open
eISSN
1336-8605
DOI
10.1515/sd-2017-0017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe text deals with the ways in which Slovak live-action films made in the 1990s introduced the topic of mistrust in the State and in its institutions. Using specific examples, the text demonstrates that such mistrust was not primarily a critical attitude, but rather consisted of two basic forms of rejection. On the one hand, live-action films made for cinema often promoted the post-modern principle of a “relative” truth, presenting a lifestyle with minimal ties to the State, sometimes also formulating a mistrust in specific state institutions (the police, state-run artistic institutions, education system) by means of irony. On the other hand, films made for state television frequently drew attention to corruption in state organisations and the fact it was usually being generally accepted as a status that did not need to be analysed. In both cases, the message of the 1990s was carried onto the next millennium, and can eventually be interpreted as a way of solidifying the discourse of mistrust that we perceive in contemporary Slovak film for cinemas and television.

Journal

Slovenske divadlo /The Slovak Theatrede Gruyter

Published: Sep 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.