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Europe on The Wrong Course

Europe on The Wrong Course Antonio Martino * A political institution can justify its existence only if it is capable of satisfying common goals that cannot be as effectively pursued at another level of government. If we accept the need for political decison making, that is, we must decide at what level those decisions must be made. The existence of European institution can be justified if, and only if, there are aims that cannot be attained at a different decision making level. The single overriding goal of European institutions is, by general agreement, the creation and protection of a single market for goods, productive factors, and services. The benefits of a unified market are generally considered unambiguous : by common consent, a unified market is regarded as a genuine "European public good." European institutions' major task, therefore, is that of preventing the introduction of restrictions to market freedom. These would very likely come about if entrenched national interests were allowed to obtain them by their national governments. The creation and maintenance of a single market is not a small task: it requires the introduction and the enforcement of a set of clearly defined rules that apply to the entire E.E.C. area. Thirty-three years http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-1990-0407
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Antonio Martino * A political institution can justify its existence only if it is capable of satisfying common goals that cannot be as effectively pursued at another level of government. If we accept the need for political decison making, that is, we must decide at what level those decisions must be made. The existence of European institution can be justified if, and only if, there are aims that cannot be attained at a different decision making level. The single overriding goal of European institutions is, by general agreement, the creation and protection of a single market for goods, productive factors, and services. The benefits of a unified market are generally considered unambiguous : by common consent, a unified market is regarded as a genuine "European public good." European institutions' major task, therefore, is that of preventing the introduction of restrictions to market freedom. These would very likely come about if entrenched national interests were allowed to obtain them by their national governments. The creation and maintenance of a single market is not a small task: it requires the introduction and the enforcement of a set of clearly defined rules that apply to the entire E.E.C. area. Thirty-three years

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Dec 1, 1990

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