Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

EU Social Security Law: A Commentary on EU Regulations 883/2004 and 987/2009

EU Social Security Law: A Commentary on EU Regulations 883/2004 and 987/2009 Administration, vol. 64, no. 1 (2016), pp. 77­81 doi: 10.1515/admin-2016-0012 Maximilian Fuchs and Rob Cornelissen (Eds) (Baden-Baden/ München/Oxford: Nomos/C.H. Beck/Hart Publishing; 2015; ISBN 978-3-848717-14-9 (Nomos), 978-3-406684-73-9 (C.H. Beck), 978-1-509903-67-2 (Hart Publishing); 554 pp; 178) Migration is one of the major challenges currently facing the EU. Understandably most of the focus is on migration from war-torn countries in the Middle East and beyond, especially Syria. However, migration within the EU's twenty-eight member states is also a major challenge, and is currently one of the central issues in the `Brexit' referendum debate in the UK. Migration has always been a major reality for Ireland, but only in recent decades has it come to involve both inward and outward migration. A recent OECD survey showed that 17.5 per cent of the Irish population over the age of fifteen who were born in Ireland live in other countries. This is the highest such percentage among the thirty-eight member countries of the OECD. Of these, 412,658 live in the UK and 74,662 live in other EU countries. Of the latter, the biggest numbers live in Spain (17,519), Germany (12,000), France (9,664), Poland (8,136), the Netherlands (5,054) and Belgium (4,030). Ireland's relative economic success http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Administration de Gruyter

EU Social Security Law: A Commentary on EU Regulations 883/2004 and 987/2009

Administration , Volume 64 (1) – May 1, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/eu-social-security-law-a-commentary-on-eu-regulations-883-2004-and-987-lRNkebgq0X
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by the
ISSN
2449-9471
eISSN
2449-9471
DOI
10.1515/admin-2016-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Administration, vol. 64, no. 1 (2016), pp. 77­81 doi: 10.1515/admin-2016-0012 Maximilian Fuchs and Rob Cornelissen (Eds) (Baden-Baden/ München/Oxford: Nomos/C.H. Beck/Hart Publishing; 2015; ISBN 978-3-848717-14-9 (Nomos), 978-3-406684-73-9 (C.H. Beck), 978-1-509903-67-2 (Hart Publishing); 554 pp; 178) Migration is one of the major challenges currently facing the EU. Understandably most of the focus is on migration from war-torn countries in the Middle East and beyond, especially Syria. However, migration within the EU's twenty-eight member states is also a major challenge, and is currently one of the central issues in the `Brexit' referendum debate in the UK. Migration has always been a major reality for Ireland, but only in recent decades has it come to involve both inward and outward migration. A recent OECD survey showed that 17.5 per cent of the Irish population over the age of fifteen who were born in Ireland live in other countries. This is the highest such percentage among the thirty-eight member countries of the OECD. Of these, 412,658 live in the UK and 74,662 live in other EU countries. Of the latter, the biggest numbers live in Spain (17,519), Germany (12,000), France (9,664), Poland (8,136), the Netherlands (5,054) and Belgium (4,030). Ireland's relative economic success

Journal

Administrationde Gruyter

Published: May 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.