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Envmonmentalism: Ethics, Reugion, and Stewardship

Envmonmentalism: Ethics, Reugion, and Stewardship Ann Jo Kwong^ 1. Introduction When faced with the frequent question "What can I do to respond to the environmental crisis?", Eric Utne, editor of the alternative press Utne Reader responds "I'd argue that the most significant change most of us need to make is in our relationship to Mother Nature." Jonathon Porritt, director of Great Britain's Friends of the Earth, expresses similar sentiments: "We have reached the stage where the spiritual dimension of the ecology movement is as likely to be motivating people as its political dimension." And so, it is no surise that terms such as "earthkeeping", "eco-justice", "eco-theology", and "green theology" have entered the environmental vernacular. Within these expressions, a consistent theme has emerged: that we need an environmental ethic to guide us in the protection and nurturing of the environment. A failed morality is behind the environmental crisis and it needs to be rectified in order to preserve life on earth. Proponents of an environmental ethic argue that the relationship between man and nature has gone askew, creating an explosion of environmental problems. Rather than respecting and treasuring nature, man has "exploited" and abused it. Such sentiments, for example, are reflected in a statement http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

Envmonmentalism: Ethics, Reugion, and Stewardship

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-1996-2-305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ann Jo Kwong^ 1. Introduction When faced with the frequent question "What can I do to respond to the environmental crisis?", Eric Utne, editor of the alternative press Utne Reader responds "I'd argue that the most significant change most of us need to make is in our relationship to Mother Nature." Jonathon Porritt, director of Great Britain's Friends of the Earth, expresses similar sentiments: "We have reached the stage where the spiritual dimension of the ecology movement is as likely to be motivating people as its political dimension." And so, it is no surise that terms such as "earthkeeping", "eco-justice", "eco-theology", and "green theology" have entered the environmental vernacular. Within these expressions, a consistent theme has emerged: that we need an environmental ethic to guide us in the protection and nurturing of the environment. A failed morality is behind the environmental crisis and it needs to be rectified in order to preserve life on earth. Proponents of an environmental ethic argue that the relationship between man and nature has gone askew, creating an explosion of environmental problems. Rather than respecting and treasuring nature, man has "exploited" and abused it. Such sentiments, for example, are reflected in a statement

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Jun 1, 1996

References