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Disciplines and Vows (Yamas and Vratas): How the Mystical Yields to the Ethical in Yoga and Jainism

Disciplines and Vows (Yamas and Vratas): How the Mystical Yields to the Ethical in... Disciplines and Vows (Yamas and Vratas): How the Mystical Yields to the Ethical in Yoga and Jainism Christopher Key Chapple Conversion followed with a life-altering resolve to abide by high ethical standards constitutes a core piece of the process of religious experience. In this paper, I will first explore the contours of these two ideas as articulated a century ago by William James. I will then look at two traditions from India that offer an Asian counterpart to this process of self-discovery: Yoga and Jainism. I will include with some reflections on my own training on the spiritual path within these traditions. William James and Walt Whitman William James writes extensively about the process of conversion. He describes it in the context of several different religious traditions and defines conversion as follows: To be converted, to be regenerated, to receive grace, to experience religion, to gain an assurance, are so many phrases which denote the process, gradual or sudden by which a self hitherto divided, and consciously wrong inferior and unhappy, becomes unified and consciously right superior and happy, in consequence of its firmer hold upon religious realities. James states that this experience, regardless of the particular religious tradition, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Religionsgeschichte de Gruyter

Disciplines and Vows (Yamas and Vratas): How the Mystical Yields to the Ethical in Yoga and Jainism

Archiv für Religionsgeschichte , Volume 9 (1): 14 – Dec 18, 2007

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2012 by Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co.
ISSN
1868-8888
eISSN
1868-8888
DOI
10.1515/9783110198737.1.9
Publisher site
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Abstract

Disciplines and Vows (Yamas and Vratas): How the Mystical Yields to the Ethical in Yoga and Jainism Christopher Key Chapple Conversion followed with a life-altering resolve to abide by high ethical standards constitutes a core piece of the process of religious experience. In this paper, I will first explore the contours of these two ideas as articulated a century ago by William James. I will then look at two traditions from India that offer an Asian counterpart to this process of self-discovery: Yoga and Jainism. I will include with some reflections on my own training on the spiritual path within these traditions. William James and Walt Whitman William James writes extensively about the process of conversion. He describes it in the context of several different religious traditions and defines conversion as follows: To be converted, to be regenerated, to receive grace, to experience religion, to gain an assurance, are so many phrases which denote the process, gradual or sudden by which a self hitherto divided, and consciously wrong inferior and unhappy, becomes unified and consciously right superior and happy, in consequence of its firmer hold upon religious realities. James states that this experience, regardless of the particular religious tradition,

Journal

Archiv für Religionsgeschichtede Gruyter

Published: Dec 18, 2007

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