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Corrigendum to: Charlotte Methuen, “‘And your daughters shall prophesy!’ Luther, Reforming Women and the Construction of Authority”, in: ARG 14 (2013), pp. 82-109

Corrigendum to: Charlotte Methuen, “‘And your daughters shall prophesy!’ Luther, Reforming Women... I am grateful to Peter Matheson for his close and appreciative reading of my article which unfortunately revealed the following factual errors relating to my presentation of the biography of Argula von Grumbach. None of these factual corrections affects the argument of my article. p. 97: The suggestion that Argula von Grumbach "lived first in Ingolstadt and then in Regensburg" is misleading. She was born in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, the family seat of Ehrenfels, lived for some years as a young lady-in-waiting in Munich, and probably moved on her marriage in 1510 to Lenting, near Ingolstadt. She later lived in Dietfurt, where her husband was appointed princely administrator in 1515; after his dismissal she divided her time between Burggrumbach and Lenting. She probably died in 1554 and was buried in Zeilitzheim, near Schweinfurt. Her brother, Bernhardin, was not "appointed a Lutheran preacher", but himself appointed a succession of Lutheran preachers. In contrast to Kirsi Stjerna, Women and the Reformation, Oxford 2009, p. 74, Matheson believes that it was highly unlikely that Argula von Grumbach could have met Spalatin in Munich, since there is no evidence that Spalatin was ever there; the encounter, he suggests, was more probably with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

Corrigendum to: Charlotte Methuen, “‘And your daughters shall prophesy!’ Luther, Reforming Women and the Construction of Authority”, in: ARG 14 (2013), pp. 82-109

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the
ISSN
2198-0489
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2015-0113
Publisher site
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Abstract

I am grateful to Peter Matheson for his close and appreciative reading of my article which unfortunately revealed the following factual errors relating to my presentation of the biography of Argula von Grumbach. None of these factual corrections affects the argument of my article. p. 97: The suggestion that Argula von Grumbach "lived first in Ingolstadt and then in Regensburg" is misleading. She was born in Beratzhausen, near Regensburg, the family seat of Ehrenfels, lived for some years as a young lady-in-waiting in Munich, and probably moved on her marriage in 1510 to Lenting, near Ingolstadt. She later lived in Dietfurt, where her husband was appointed princely administrator in 1515; after his dismissal she divided her time between Burggrumbach and Lenting. She probably died in 1554 and was buried in Zeilitzheim, near Schweinfurt. Her brother, Bernhardin, was not "appointed a Lutheran preacher", but himself appointed a succession of Lutheran preachers. In contrast to Kirsi Stjerna, Women and the Reformation, Oxford 2009, p. 74, Matheson believes that it was highly unlikely that Argula von Grumbach could have met Spalatin in Munich, since there is no evidence that Spalatin was ever there; the encounter, he suggests, was more probably with

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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