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Consolidating peace: Rethinking the community relations model in Northern Ireland

Consolidating peace: Rethinking the community relations model in Northern Ireland AbstractNorthern Ireland has now moved from ‘negative’ peace (the absence of violence, largely) to ‘positive’ peace (confidence-building measures to consolidate gains in voting practice and in reducing discrimination against the minority community in employment and housing allocation). This transition has involved funders at the European, regional and local levels investing in peace and reconciliation measures to consolidate political gains made since the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement in 1998. This paper examines the achievements made to date, the extent to which they have resulted in a peace dividend for those most impacted by the violence, and whether the focus of peace-building interventions should shift away from the traditional community relations model. It finds that the reformed local authorities in Northern Ireland and the border regions could play a pivotal role in making a significant difference to peace-building through new legal powers in community planning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Administration de Gruyter

Consolidating peace: Rethinking the community relations model in Northern Ireland

Administration , Volume 66 (3): 25 – Aug 1, 2018

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 Colin Knox, published by Sciendo
eISSN
2449-9471
DOI
10.2478/admin-2018-0025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractNorthern Ireland has now moved from ‘negative’ peace (the absence of violence, largely) to ‘positive’ peace (confidence-building measures to consolidate gains in voting practice and in reducing discrimination against the minority community in employment and housing allocation). This transition has involved funders at the European, regional and local levels investing in peace and reconciliation measures to consolidate political gains made since the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement in 1998. This paper examines the achievements made to date, the extent to which they have resulted in a peace dividend for those most impacted by the violence, and whether the focus of peace-building interventions should shift away from the traditional community relations model. It finds that the reformed local authorities in Northern Ireland and the border regions could play a pivotal role in making a significant difference to peace-building through new legal powers in community planning.

Journal

Administrationde Gruyter

Published: Aug 1, 2018

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