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Competition Among Systems, Harmonisation and Integration

Competition Among Systems, Harmonisation and Integration Manfred E. Streit0 1. Introduction and overview Almost throughout the whole process of European integration, harmonisation of national laws and regulations was considered a matter of course. The competing strategy -- allowing competition among institutional systems (CS) or institutional competition -- almost went unnoticed. Among those economists who registered the decisions of the European Court of Justice favouring CS, it can be observed that at least some take an almost perfect CS for granted within the limits drawn by the Court. The most rigorous analyses go as far as claiming market failure in the sense of "ruinous competition". The analytical basis for this kind of judgement is a straightforward analogy b e t w e e n neoclassical views of both, economic and political competition. These types of competition are then linked to form a model of CS. In this paper I shall take a more sophisticated view. It emerges not only from a diverging concept of economic competition but also from a view of political competition which refrains from drawing a simple analogy with e c o n o m i c competition. Given both, CS as the interaction between the two types of competition appears to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

Competition Among Systems, Harmonisation and Integration

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-1998-2-304
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Manfred E. Streit0 1. Introduction and overview Almost throughout the whole process of European integration, harmonisation of national laws and regulations was considered a matter of course. The competing strategy -- allowing competition among institutional systems (CS) or institutional competition -- almost went unnoticed. Among those economists who registered the decisions of the European Court of Justice favouring CS, it can be observed that at least some take an almost perfect CS for granted within the limits drawn by the Court. The most rigorous analyses go as far as claiming market failure in the sense of "ruinous competition". The analytical basis for this kind of judgement is a straightforward analogy b e t w e e n neoclassical views of both, economic and political competition. These types of competition are then linked to form a model of CS. In this paper I shall take a more sophisticated view. It emerges not only from a diverging concept of economic competition but also from a view of political competition which refrains from drawing a simple analogy with e c o n o m i c competition. Given both, CS as the interaction between the two types of competition appears to

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Jun 1, 1998

References