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Coexistence Strategies: The Strangers in London and the Vestment Controversies

Coexistence Strategies: The Strangers in London and the Vestment Controversies Coexistence Strategies: The Strangers in London and the Vestment Controversies By Silke Muylaert Reformed strangers from the Low Countries and France fled to England dur- ingthereignsofEdwardVIandElizabethIandcametoresideinasocietystill searching for a reformed religious settlement. In both reigns, questions con- cerning the use of clerical vestments resurfaced and disturbed the English reli- gious and political community. The Reformed migrants who held privileges nottoconformtoEnglishecclesiasticalritualsintheirchurchesbecameimpli- cated in these debates, but they reacted differently to the controversy each time.Usingachronologicalcomparisonallowsustoassesshowandwhythese earlymodernminoritiesvocalizedtheirviewsandwhytheydidnot.Itdemon- strates how the stranger churches navigated political and religious circum- stancesin orderto survive. According to the traditional historiographical view, residing in Reformed exile communities in England and the Holy Roman Empire in the sixteenth century hardened the Dutch Protestant migrants’ position on doctrinal and ecclesiastical questions and made them militant in their stance against other religious denominations and the magistracy. In several recent publications, scholars have questioned this so-called radicalism and the confessional Calvi- 1. MostexplicitinJ.Briels,Zuid-NederlandersindeRepubliek,1572–1630:Eendemogra- fischeencultuurhistorischestudie(Sint-Niklaas:Danthe,1985),309;Geert H.Janssen,“Exiles and the Politics of Reintegration in the Dutch Revolt,” History 94 (2009): 36–52, here 39; Geert H. Janssen, “The Counter-Reformation of the Refugee: Exile and the Shaping of Catholic Militancy in the Dutch Revolt,” Journal of Ecclesiastical History 63 (2012): 671– 692, here 680–681; Andrew Pettegree, Emden http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation History de Gruyter

Coexistence Strategies: The Strangers in London and the Vestment Controversies

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2021 by Gütersloher Verlagshaus
eISSN
2198-0489
DOI
10.14315/arg-2021-1120112
Publisher site
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Abstract

Coexistence Strategies: The Strangers in London and the Vestment Controversies By Silke Muylaert Reformed strangers from the Low Countries and France fled to England dur- ingthereignsofEdwardVIandElizabethIandcametoresideinasocietystill searching for a reformed religious settlement. In both reigns, questions con- cerning the use of clerical vestments resurfaced and disturbed the English reli- gious and political community. The Reformed migrants who held privileges nottoconformtoEnglishecclesiasticalritualsintheirchurchesbecameimpli- cated in these debates, but they reacted differently to the controversy each time.Usingachronologicalcomparisonallowsustoassesshowandwhythese earlymodernminoritiesvocalizedtheirviewsandwhytheydidnot.Itdemon- strates how the stranger churches navigated political and religious circum- stancesin orderto survive. According to the traditional historiographical view, residing in Reformed exile communities in England and the Holy Roman Empire in the sixteenth century hardened the Dutch Protestant migrants’ position on doctrinal and ecclesiastical questions and made them militant in their stance against other religious denominations and the magistracy. In several recent publications, scholars have questioned this so-called radicalism and the confessional Calvi- 1. MostexplicitinJ.Briels,Zuid-NederlandersindeRepubliek,1572–1630:Eendemogra- fischeencultuurhistorischestudie(Sint-Niklaas:Danthe,1985),309;Geert H.Janssen,“Exiles and the Politics of Reintegration in the Dutch Revolt,” History 94 (2009): 36–52, here 39; Geert H. Janssen, “The Counter-Reformation of the Refugee: Exile and the Shaping of Catholic Militancy in the Dutch Revolt,” Journal of Ecclesiastical History 63 (2012): 671– 692, here 680–681; Andrew Pettegree, Emden

Journal

Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte - Archive for Reformation Historyde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2021

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