Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Aestheticism in The Theory of Custom

Aestheticism in The Theory of Custom Ekkehart Schlicht0 First we may observe, that the supposition, that the future resembles the past, is not founded on arguments of any kind, but is derived entirely from habit., by which we are determined to expect for the future the same train of objects, to which we have been accustomed. David Hume (1740, 134) 1. Introduction Customs, habits, and routines provide the bedrock for many economic and social formations yet our understanding of the processes that underlie the growth and decay of customs is very limited. The theory of social evolution has hardly commenced to evolve. The 'clarity' view of custom proposed in my recent book On Custom in the Economy posits the desire of individuals to detect patterns in their social environment and to act in a patterned fashion. They have a 'rule preference', and this gives rise to the formation of customs and social evolution. In this essay, I offer some supplementary arguments which support this position from the perspective of learning theory and evolutionary psychology. The first issue to be dealt with relates to learning (Sections 2 to 8). What processes should we envisage for the way in which the rules of custom are learned http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal des Économistes et des Études Humaines de Gruyter

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/aestheticism-in-the-theory-of-custom-aq9SR0Lgz7
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by the
ISSN
2194-5799
eISSN
2153-1552
DOI
10.1515/jeeh-2000-0102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ekkehart Schlicht0 First we may observe, that the supposition, that the future resembles the past, is not founded on arguments of any kind, but is derived entirely from habit., by which we are determined to expect for the future the same train of objects, to which we have been accustomed. David Hume (1740, 134) 1. Introduction Customs, habits, and routines provide the bedrock for many economic and social formations yet our understanding of the processes that underlie the growth and decay of customs is very limited. The theory of social evolution has hardly commenced to evolve. The 'clarity' view of custom proposed in my recent book On Custom in the Economy posits the desire of individuals to detect patterns in their social environment and to act in a patterned fashion. They have a 'rule preference', and this gives rise to the formation of customs and social evolution. In this essay, I offer some supplementary arguments which support this position from the perspective of learning theory and evolutionary psychology. The first issue to be dealt with relates to learning (Sections 2 to 8). What processes should we envisage for the way in which the rules of custom are learned

Journal

Journal des Économistes et des Études Humainesde Gruyter

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.