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A Study of Local Anaesthetics. Part 202. Determination of the Critical Micellar Concentration of Carbisocainium Chloride in Water Using Spectral Methods and the Probe Pyrene

A Study of Local Anaesthetics. Part 202. Determination of the Critical Micellar Concentration of... Keywords Kúcové slová: 1. Introduction One of the basic phenomena occurring in surfactant solutions is the aggregation of amphiphilic molecules. The formation of these aggregates, the so-called micelles, is determined by the chemical nature of amphiphilic molecules and the physicochemical conditions of the solvent (Fainerman et al., 2001). When dissolved in water, they lower the surface tension of the water and increase the solubility of organic compounds (Basu Ray et al., 2006). The narrow concentration range where aggregates start to form and the physicochemical properties of the solution change abruptly has been called the critical miceller concentration (cmc) (Fainerman et al., 2001). The process of self-association of surfactants into micelles, vesicles and membranes plays a very important role in many areas, ranging from biological systems to technical applications (Tanford, 1980). There are several techniques such as tensiometry, conductometry, fluorimetry, calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the determination of cmc. Spectral methods such as absorption spectroscopy in ultraviolet/ visible (UV/VIS) region of spectrum and fluorescence spectroscopy using other compounds as probes are also used for the evaluation of cmc (Aguiar et al., 2003; Basu Ray et al., 2006). Pyrene as a fluorescent probe has become one of the most studied of all organic molecules in terms of its photophysical properties (Vullev et al., 2005). As a consequence of the strong influence of the surrounding medium on fluorescence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Facultatis Pharmaceuticae Universitatis Comenianae de Gruyter

A Study of Local Anaesthetics. Part 202. Determination of the Critical Micellar Concentration of Carbisocainium Chloride in Water Using Spectral Methods and the Probe Pyrene

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the
ISSN
0301-2298
DOI
10.2478/afpuc-2013-0024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keywords Kúcové slová: 1. Introduction One of the basic phenomena occurring in surfactant solutions is the aggregation of amphiphilic molecules. The formation of these aggregates, the so-called micelles, is determined by the chemical nature of amphiphilic molecules and the physicochemical conditions of the solvent (Fainerman et al., 2001). When dissolved in water, they lower the surface tension of the water and increase the solubility of organic compounds (Basu Ray et al., 2006). The narrow concentration range where aggregates start to form and the physicochemical properties of the solution change abruptly has been called the critical miceller concentration (cmc) (Fainerman et al., 2001). The process of self-association of surfactants into micelles, vesicles and membranes plays a very important role in many areas, ranging from biological systems to technical applications (Tanford, 1980). There are several techniques such as tensiometry, conductometry, fluorimetry, calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the determination of cmc. Spectral methods such as absorption spectroscopy in ultraviolet/ visible (UV/VIS) region of spectrum and fluorescence spectroscopy using other compounds as probes are also used for the evaluation of cmc (Aguiar et al., 2003; Basu Ray et al., 2006). Pyrene as a fluorescent probe has become one of the most studied of all organic molecules in terms of its photophysical properties (Vullev et al., 2005). As a consequence of the strong influence of the surrounding medium on fluorescence

Journal

Acta Facultatis Pharmaceuticae Universitatis Comenianaede Gruyter

Published: Jun 27, 2013

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