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Women’s knowledge and hypothetical acceptance of expedited partner therapy for chlamydia

Women’s knowledge and hypothetical acceptance of expedited partner therapy for chlamydia BackgroundExpedited partner therapy (EPT) for chlamydia can be an important public health tool to treat the sex partners of newly diagnosed individuals, especially when those sex partners are women of reproductive ages. Untreated and repeat chlamydia infections increase a woman’s risk for subfertility. This study aimed to determine the knowledge of EPT, and the factors associated with EPT knowledge, among reproductive-aged women.MethodsWomen aged 18–40 years were recruited for a community sample from a large state fair; 871 women completed a questionnaire for this study. Women reported on their knowledge of sexually transmitted infections, and about their knowledge and attitudes toward EPT. Using a hypothetical example, women were asked if they would accept EPT.ResultsThis community sample of reproductive-aged women found overwhelming hypothetical support for chlamydia testing, partner notification, and partner treatment. However, only 12% of women reported having heard of EPT prior to the survey; once EPT was described, there were high levels of support for EPT and the belief that EPT could reduce chlamydia rates. Half of the women strongly agreed that EPT could reduce chlamydia rates, and 48% supported the state law allowing for EPT. Working in the healthcare field was the only independent determinant of prior EPT knowledge, increasing the odds of hearing about EPT by more than 2.5-fold.ConclusionsDespite overwhelming support of the tenets of EPT, our results indicate that prior knowledge of EPT is low among women, meaning that education about EPT is needed for those outside of the healthcare field. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sexual Health CSIRO Publishing

Women’s knowledge and hypothetical acceptance of expedited partner therapy for chlamydia

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Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1448-5028
eISSN
1449-8987
DOI
10.1071/SH21157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BackgroundExpedited partner therapy (EPT) for chlamydia can be an important public health tool to treat the sex partners of newly diagnosed individuals, especially when those sex partners are women of reproductive ages. Untreated and repeat chlamydia infections increase a woman’s risk for subfertility. This study aimed to determine the knowledge of EPT, and the factors associated with EPT knowledge, among reproductive-aged women.MethodsWomen aged 18–40 years were recruited for a community sample from a large state fair; 871 women completed a questionnaire for this study. Women reported on their knowledge of sexually transmitted infections, and about their knowledge and attitudes toward EPT. Using a hypothetical example, women were asked if they would accept EPT.ResultsThis community sample of reproductive-aged women found overwhelming hypothetical support for chlamydia testing, partner notification, and partner treatment. However, only 12% of women reported having heard of EPT prior to the survey; once EPT was described, there were high levels of support for EPT and the belief that EPT could reduce chlamydia rates. Half of the women strongly agreed that EPT could reduce chlamydia rates, and 48% supported the state law allowing for EPT. Working in the healthcare field was the only independent determinant of prior EPT knowledge, increasing the odds of hearing about EPT by more than 2.5-fold.ConclusionsDespite overwhelming support of the tenets of EPT, our results indicate that prior knowledge of EPT is low among women, meaning that education about EPT is needed for those outside of the healthcare field.

Journal

Sexual HealthCSIRO Publishing

Published: Dec 20, 2021

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