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Increased lyrebird presence in a post-fire landscape

Increased lyrebird presence in a post-fire landscape Prescribed fires for fuel reduction affect wildlife in several ways. We observed a marked increase in superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) numbers after a controlled burn in Guy Fawkes River National Park, New South Wales, in April and May 2014. The fire occurred during the winter breeding season however, congregations of males were often seen together in the burnt landscape, indicating an opportunistic prioritisation of foraging. The low-intensity fire cleared brush and low-level vegetation, thus decreasing foraging effort and potentially attracting the species despite the need to seek mating partners. Controlled burns therefore have the potential to attract superb lyrebirds immediately after fire due to ease of movement and foraging effort. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Zoology CSIRO Publishing

Increased lyrebird presence in a post-fire landscape

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Publisher
CSIRO Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
0004-959X
eISSN
1446-5698
DOI
10.1071/ZO14053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prescribed fires for fuel reduction affect wildlife in several ways. We observed a marked increase in superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) numbers after a controlled burn in Guy Fawkes River National Park, New South Wales, in April and May 2014. The fire occurred during the winter breeding season however, congregations of males were often seen together in the burnt landscape, indicating an opportunistic prioritisation of foraging. The low-intensity fire cleared brush and low-level vegetation, thus decreasing foraging effort and potentially attracting the species despite the need to seek mating partners. Controlled burns therefore have the potential to attract superb lyrebirds immediately after fire due to ease of movement and foraging effort.

Journal

Australian Journal of ZoologyCSIRO Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2014

References