Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Those We Don't Speak Of: Indians in The Village

Those We Don't Speak Of: Indians in The Village <jats:p>American literary studies has shown that the symbolic exclusion of Native Americans from the Puritan and early national imaginaries was an essential component of the making of an American identity. This argument builds on reading practices that stress literary-historical contextualization. Our essay considers how M. Night Shyamalan's film <jats:italic>The Village</jats:italic> (2004) addresses the continuing relevance of Native American exclusion from the national imaginary not by faithfully representing “history” but by layering its narrative with multiple historical registers. Realized through editing, cinematography, and set design, these registers—seventeenth-century Puritan, turn-of-the-twentieth-century utopian, and “the present”—are stage-managed by a group of idealistic elders who wish to protect their community from the evils of the world outside. While most critics have reduced <jats:italic>The Village</jats:italic> to an allegory of post-9/11 United States political culture, we propose a viewing of the film as parable that marks historical collapses and exclusions as the limits of utopia.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PMLA/Publications of the Modern Language Association of America CrossRef

Those We Don't Speak Of: Indians in The Village

PMLA/Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , Volume 123 (2): 358-374 – Mar 1, 2008

Those We Don't Speak Of: Indians in The Village


Abstract

<jats:p>American literary studies has shown that the symbolic exclusion of Native Americans from the Puritan and early national imaginaries was an essential component of the making of an American identity. This argument builds on reading practices that stress literary-historical contextualization. Our essay considers how M. Night Shyamalan's film <jats:italic>The Village</jats:italic> (2004) addresses the continuing relevance of Native American exclusion from the national imaginary not by faithfully representing “history” but by layering its narrative with multiple historical registers. Realized through editing, cinematography, and set design, these registers—seventeenth-century Puritan, turn-of-the-twentieth-century utopian, and “the present”—are stage-managed by a group of idealistic elders who wish to protect their community from the evils of the world outside. While most critics have reduced <jats:italic>The Village</jats:italic> to an allegory of post-9/11 United States political culture, we propose a viewing of the film as parable that marks historical collapses and exclusions as the limits of utopia.</jats:p>

Loading next page...
 
/lp/crossref/those-we-don-t-speak-of-indians-in-the-village-UFEwPq8h5n

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0030-8129
DOI
10.1632/pmla.2008.123.2.358
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>American literary studies has shown that the symbolic exclusion of Native Americans from the Puritan and early national imaginaries was an essential component of the making of an American identity. This argument builds on reading practices that stress literary-historical contextualization. Our essay considers how M. Night Shyamalan's film <jats:italic>The Village</jats:italic> (2004) addresses the continuing relevance of Native American exclusion from the national imaginary not by faithfully representing “history” but by layering its narrative with multiple historical registers. Realized through editing, cinematography, and set design, these registers—seventeenth-century Puritan, turn-of-the-twentieth-century utopian, and “the present”—are stage-managed by a group of idealistic elders who wish to protect their community from the evils of the world outside. While most critics have reduced <jats:italic>The Village</jats:italic> to an allegory of post-9/11 United States political culture, we propose a viewing of the film as parable that marks historical collapses and exclusions as the limits of utopia.</jats:p>

Journal

PMLA/Publications of the Modern Language Association of AmericaCrossRef

Published: Mar 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.