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TIKAL'S EARLY CLASSIC DOMINATION OF THE GREAT WESTERN TRADE ROUTE: CERAMIC, LITHIC, AND ICONOGRAPHIC EVIDENCE

TIKAL'S EARLY CLASSIC DOMINATION OF THE GREAT WESTERN TRADE ROUTE: CERAMIC, LITHIC, AND... AbstractThis article reviews new evidence suggesting that Tikal and its allies controlled trade along the Pasión River during the latter half of the Early Classic period (ca. a.d. 460–550) and the possible impacts this had on geopolitical interaction. Recent data in the Candelaria Caves and other Pasión River sites showed the strong influence of Tikal during this time period that could indicate that they were active agents in interregional trade between the Maya highlands and lowlands. A quantitative reevaluation of the Pennsylvania lithic collection does demonstrate an important change in Tikal's importation of both obsidian and jade during the Early Classic period. Together, the stylistic changes in the locally manufactured ceramics and the drastic increase of lithic raw materials at Tikal strongly suggest that Tikal was directly or indirectly controlling the Chixoy-Pasión trade route at this time. After the defeat of Tikal by Caracol in a.d. 562, it apparently lost this influence, ceasing to be a strong agent in jade and obsidian production and exchange, instead becoming a wealthy consumer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Mesoamerica Cambridge University Press

TIKAL'S EARLY CLASSIC DOMINATION OF THE GREAT WESTERN TRADE ROUTE: CERAMIC, LITHIC, AND ICONOGRAPHIC EVIDENCE

Ancient Mesoamerica , Volume 23 (2): 21 – Dec 18, 2012

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References (132)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012
ISSN
1469-1787
eISSN
0956-5361
DOI
10.1017/S0956536112000156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article reviews new evidence suggesting that Tikal and its allies controlled trade along the Pasión River during the latter half of the Early Classic period (ca. a.d. 460–550) and the possible impacts this had on geopolitical interaction. Recent data in the Candelaria Caves and other Pasión River sites showed the strong influence of Tikal during this time period that could indicate that they were active agents in interregional trade between the Maya highlands and lowlands. A quantitative reevaluation of the Pennsylvania lithic collection does demonstrate an important change in Tikal's importation of both obsidian and jade during the Early Classic period. Together, the stylistic changes in the locally manufactured ceramics and the drastic increase of lithic raw materials at Tikal strongly suggest that Tikal was directly or indirectly controlling the Chixoy-Pasión trade route at this time. After the defeat of Tikal by Caracol in a.d. 562, it apparently lost this influence, ceasing to be a strong agent in jade and obsidian production and exchange, instead becoming a wealthy consumer.

Journal

Ancient MesoamericaCambridge University Press

Published: Dec 18, 2012

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