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PROBLEMATICAL DEPOSITS AT TIKAL, GUATEMALA: CONTENT, CONTEXT, AND INTENT

PROBLEMATICAL DEPOSITS AT TIKAL, GUATEMALA: CONTENT, CONTEXT, AND INTENT AbstractIn the Mesoamerican archaeological literature, collections of material regarded as somehow anomalous according to the archaeologist's expectations are often referred to as problematical deposits (PDs). Their problematical aspect originates in the researcher's current state of knowledge of the particular site, not in past behavior. PDs are site-specific, provisional classifications, and need further study to determine the function or intent of the activity that created them. A sample of 223 features designated as PDs by the University of Pennsylvania Museum's Tikal Project is examined here in an approach to understand their intent. A typology of the sample, based upon content, date, and variables of recovery context, indicates three principal intents broadly summarized as ritual, political, and site maintenance, and a category of PDs without intent. The study of PDs demands a wide-ranging approach. It provides an opportunity to reevaluate inadequate ideas and gain new insights into past cultural behavior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Mesoamerica Cambridge University Press

PROBLEMATICAL DEPOSITS AT TIKAL, GUATEMALA: CONTENT, CONTEXT, AND INTENT

Ancient Mesoamerica , Volume 31 (1): 17 – Jan 1, 2020

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press, 2019
ISSN
1469-1787
eISSN
0956-5361
DOI
10.1017/S095653611900018X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn the Mesoamerican archaeological literature, collections of material regarded as somehow anomalous according to the archaeologist's expectations are often referred to as problematical deposits (PDs). Their problematical aspect originates in the researcher's current state of knowledge of the particular site, not in past behavior. PDs are site-specific, provisional classifications, and need further study to determine the function or intent of the activity that created them. A sample of 223 features designated as PDs by the University of Pennsylvania Museum's Tikal Project is examined here in an approach to understand their intent. A typology of the sample, based upon content, date, and variables of recovery context, indicates three principal intents broadly summarized as ritual, political, and site maintenance, and a category of PDs without intent. The study of PDs demands a wide-ranging approach. It provides an opportunity to reevaluate inadequate ideas and gain new insights into past cultural behavior.

Journal

Ancient MesoamericaCambridge University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2020

References