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INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION In this issue, we offer a Special Section on problematical and on-floor deposits in Classic Maya sites in Belize coordinated by James J. Aimers, Julie A. Hoggarth, Jaime J. Awe, and Arlen F. Chase. Ten articles by several authors flesh out this topic and offer an in-depth exploration that is sure to be of use to Mesoamerican archaeologists and archaeologists in general. Anyone who has excavated structures—from the smallest to the largest, plazas, or extramural areas—will have encountered such deposits that can test our acumen. The term “problematical deposit” (PD; those working in Belize are partial to the term “problematic deposit,” and use it throughout this Special Section) was coined during the Tikal Project in the 1960s to account for a deposit that was neither a cache nor a burial but was produced by some other behavior (see the article by Moholy-Nagy (2020) in this issue for an update). This term is relative, for the issue resides in the archaeological interpretation of the deposit, not in the behaviors that produced it. Many of the PDs occur on floors, and this Special Section emphasizes how we can better interpret on-floor deposits. Numerous examples highlight the heterogeneity of remains, and advance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Mesoamerica Cambridge University Press

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press, 2020
ISSN
1469-1787
eISSN
0956-5361
DOI
10.1017/S0956536120000127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue, we offer a Special Section on problematical and on-floor deposits in Classic Maya sites in Belize coordinated by James J. Aimers, Julie A. Hoggarth, Jaime J. Awe, and Arlen F. Chase. Ten articles by several authors flesh out this topic and offer an in-depth exploration that is sure to be of use to Mesoamerican archaeologists and archaeologists in general. Anyone who has excavated structures—from the smallest to the largest, plazas, or extramural areas—will have encountered such deposits that can test our acumen. The term “problematical deposit” (PD; those working in Belize are partial to the term “problematic deposit,” and use it throughout this Special Section) was coined during the Tikal Project in the 1960s to account for a deposit that was neither a cache nor a burial but was produced by some other behavior (see the article by Moholy-Nagy (2020) in this issue for an update). This term is relative, for the issue resides in the archaeological interpretation of the deposit, not in the behaviors that produced it. Many of the PDs occur on floors, and this Special Section emphasizes how we can better interpret on-floor deposits. Numerous examples highlight the heterogeneity of remains, and advance

Journal

Ancient MesoamericaCambridge University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2020

References