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FIGURINES ARE US? THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF JAINA ISLAND, CAMPECHE, MEXICO

FIGURINES ARE US? THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF JAINA ISLAND, CAMPECHE, MEXICO AbstractDespite the recognition by many scholars of the high esthetic value of Jaina-style figurines, they present a number of analytic problems. Their functions remain obscure, and their role in Late Classic period Maya society has not been adequately examined. Throughout southeastern Mesoamerica, with few exceptions, all figurines and fragments are found in domestic contexts, mostly trash heaps; on Jaina, most examples come from graves. This article addresses the question of Jaina exceptionalism. It places its unique features in the broader context of Terminal Classic political and economic developments that were sweeping across the northern Maya Lowlands. Here I argue that the use of figurines in domestic rituals determined their appropriateness for placement in a particular grave, rather than the age, sex, or occupation of the deceased. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Mesoamerica Cambridge University Press

FIGURINES ARE US? THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF JAINA ISLAND, CAMPECHE, MEXICO

Ancient Mesoamerica , Volume 23 (2): 24 – Dec 18, 2012

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References (121)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012
ISSN
1469-1787
eISSN
0956-5361
DOI
10.1017/S0956536112000168
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractDespite the recognition by many scholars of the high esthetic value of Jaina-style figurines, they present a number of analytic problems. Their functions remain obscure, and their role in Late Classic period Maya society has not been adequately examined. Throughout southeastern Mesoamerica, with few exceptions, all figurines and fragments are found in domestic contexts, mostly trash heaps; on Jaina, most examples come from graves. This article addresses the question of Jaina exceptionalism. It places its unique features in the broader context of Terminal Classic political and economic developments that were sweeping across the northern Maya Lowlands. Here I argue that the use of figurines in domestic rituals determined their appropriateness for placement in a particular grave, rather than the age, sex, or occupation of the deceased.

Journal

Ancient MesoamericaCambridge University Press

Published: Dec 18, 2012

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