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Book Review: Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture

Book Review: Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture sWhen graphic designer and computer scientist John Maeda became president of the Rhode Island School of Design in 2008, he famously challenged the current national trend in education that prioritized the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by demanding an additional focus on the arts. Calling for the transformation of the STEM movement into the STEAM movement, Maeda argued that the commingling of science and engineering with art and design was essential in developing creative solutions to the myriad social and economic challenges of the twenty-first century. In his new book, Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture, historian W. Patrick McCray reminds us that the modern-day effort to bridge the divide between what chemist Charles Percy Snow famously referred to in 1959 as the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities has a much longer history, one rooted in an earlier Cold War landscape in which artists and engineers in the United States and abroad utilized the technological innovations emerging from the military-industrial complex of the 1950s and 1960s to push the boundaries of modern art and design. Well researched and beautifully written, McCray’s book narrates the myriad http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the History of Economic Thought Cambridge University Press

Book Review: Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture

Journal of the History of Economic Thought , Volume 44 (1): 3 – Mar 1, 2022

Book Review: Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture

Journal of the History of Economic Thought , Volume 44 (1): 3 – Mar 1, 2022

Abstract

sWhen graphic designer and computer scientist John Maeda became president of the Rhode Island School of Design in 2008, he famously challenged the current national trend in education that prioritized the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by demanding an additional focus on the arts. Calling for the transformation of the STEM movement into the STEAM movement, Maeda argued that the commingling of science and engineering with art and design was essential in developing creative solutions to the myriad social and economic challenges of the twenty-first century. In his new book, Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture, historian W. Patrick McCray reminds us that the modern-day effort to bridge the divide between what chemist Charles Percy Snow famously referred to in 1959 as the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities has a much longer history, one rooted in an earlier Cold War landscape in which artists and engineers in the United States and abroad utilized the technological innovations emerging from the military-industrial complex of the 1950s and 1960s to push the boundaries of modern art and design. Well researched and beautifully written, McCray’s book narrates the myriad

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the History of Economics Society
ISSN
1053-8372
eISSN
1469-9656
DOI
10.1017/S1053837221000171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

sWhen graphic designer and computer scientist John Maeda became president of the Rhode Island School of Design in 2008, he famously challenged the current national trend in education that prioritized the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by demanding an additional focus on the arts. Calling for the transformation of the STEM movement into the STEAM movement, Maeda argued that the commingling of science and engineering with art and design was essential in developing creative solutions to the myriad social and economic challenges of the twenty-first century. In his new book, Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture, historian W. Patrick McCray reminds us that the modern-day effort to bridge the divide between what chemist Charles Percy Snow famously referred to in 1959 as the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities has a much longer history, one rooted in an earlier Cold War landscape in which artists and engineers in the United States and abroad utilized the technological innovations emerging from the military-industrial complex of the 1950s and 1960s to push the boundaries of modern art and design. Well researched and beautifully written, McCray’s book narrates the myriad

Journal

Journal of the History of Economic ThoughtCambridge University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2022

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