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APPLYING REGIONAL, CONTEXTUAL, ETHNOHISTORIC, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACHES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PERI-ABANDONMENT DEPOSITS IN WESTERN BELIZE

APPLYING REGIONAL, CONTEXTUAL, ETHNOHISTORIC, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACHES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE... AbstractThe discovery of cultural remains on or above the floors of rooms and courtyards at several Maya sites has been interpreted by some archaeologists as problematic deposits, squatter's refuse, as evidence for feasting, termination rituals, de facto refuse, or rapid abandonment as a result of warfare. Investigations by the Belize Valley Archaeological Reconnaissance Project have recorded similar deposits at several surface and subterranean sites in Western Belize. Our regional, contextual, and methodological approaches for studying these deposits, coupled with ethnohistoric and ethnographic information, provide limited support for the interpretation of these remains as de facto refuse or due to rapid abandonment. Instead, we argue that these deposits are more likely the result of peri-abandonment activities such as propitiation rituals and/or pilgrimages during and after the gradual abandonment of sites in the Belize River Valley. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Mesoamerica Cambridge University Press

APPLYING REGIONAL, CONTEXTUAL, ETHNOHISTORIC, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACHES FOR UNDERSTANDING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PERI-ABANDONMENT DEPOSITS IN WESTERN BELIZE

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References (99)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press, 2020
ISSN
1469-1787
eISSN
0956-5361
DOI
10.1017/S095653611900021X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe discovery of cultural remains on or above the floors of rooms and courtyards at several Maya sites has been interpreted by some archaeologists as problematic deposits, squatter's refuse, as evidence for feasting, termination rituals, de facto refuse, or rapid abandonment as a result of warfare. Investigations by the Belize Valley Archaeological Reconnaissance Project have recorded similar deposits at several surface and subterranean sites in Western Belize. Our regional, contextual, and methodological approaches for studying these deposits, coupled with ethnohistoric and ethnographic information, provide limited support for the interpretation of these remains as de facto refuse or due to rapid abandonment. Instead, we argue that these deposits are more likely the result of peri-abandonment activities such as propitiation rituals and/or pilgrimages during and after the gradual abandonment of sites in the Belize River Valley.

Journal

Ancient MesoamericaCambridge University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2020

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