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A REASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF THE EASTERN AZTEC EMPIRE IN THE MESOAMERICAN GULF LOWLANDS

A REASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF THE EASTERN AZTEC EMPIRE IN THE MESOAMERICAN GULF LOWLANDS AbstractEthnohistoric documents have been used to define the eastern limits of the Aztec empire in the Mesoamerican southern Gulf lowlands with contradictory results. Until the research presented here, complementary archaeological evidence for Aztec imperial interactions has largely evaded detection in this region. In this paper, I review the documentary data for Aztec expansion and interactions near its eastern frontier and present the most robust archaeological evidence discovered to date that supports this imperial presence in the southern Gulf lowlands. A new model for imperial-local interaction is also introduced. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Mesoamerica Cambridge University Press

A REASSESSMENT OF THE EXTENT OF THE EASTERN AZTEC EMPIRE IN THE MESOAMERICAN GULF LOWLANDS

Ancient Mesoamerica , Volume 23 (2): 16 – Dec 18, 2012

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012
ISSN
1469-1787
eISSN
0956-5361
DOI
10.1017/S095653611200017X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractEthnohistoric documents have been used to define the eastern limits of the Aztec empire in the Mesoamerican southern Gulf lowlands with contradictory results. Until the research presented here, complementary archaeological evidence for Aztec imperial interactions has largely evaded detection in this region. In this paper, I review the documentary data for Aztec expansion and interactions near its eastern frontier and present the most robust archaeological evidence discovered to date that supports this imperial presence in the southern Gulf lowlands. A new model for imperial-local interaction is also introduced.

Journal

Ancient MesoamericaCambridge University Press

Published: Dec 18, 2012

References