Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Study on the Effects of Tablet Colour in the Treatment of Anxiety States

Study on the Effects of Tablet Colour in the Treatment of Anxiety States Forty-eight patients with anxiety states were treated with oxazepam (Serenid-D), which was administered in tablets of three different colours—red, yellow, and green. Every patient received one week's treatment with each colour, according to a random programme. A latin square design was used to ensure complete balance between the colours and between the weeks. The patients' symptoms were categorized and then assessed by both weekly physicians' ratings and daily self-rating, which showed close agreement. Colour preference was shown on both these scales in that symptoms of anxiety were most improved with green, whereas depressive symptoms appeared to respond best to yellow. Such colour preferences, however, did not reach levels of statistical significance, except for phobias as rated on the physicians' assessment. The results indicate that colour may play a part in the response to a drug. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Medical Journal British Medical Journal

Study on the Effects of Tablet Colour in the Treatment of Anxiety States

Study on the Effects of Tablet Colour in the Treatment of Anxiety States

British Medical Journal , Volume 2 (5707) – May 23, 1970

Abstract


Forty-eight patients with anxiety states were treated with oxazepam (Serenid-D), which was administered in tablets of three different colours—red, yellow, and green. Every patient received one week's treatment with each colour, according to a random programme. A latin square design was used to ensure complete balance between the colours and between the weeks. The patients' symptoms were categorized and then assessed by both weekly physicians' ratings and daily self-rating, which showed close agreement. Colour preference was shown on both these scales in that symptoms of anxiety were most improved with green, whereas depressive symptoms appeared to respond best to yellow. Such colour preferences, however, did not reach levels of statistical significance, except for phobias as rated on the physicians' assessment.
The results indicate that colour may play a part in the response to a drug.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/british-medical-journal/study-on-the-effects-of-tablet-colour-in-the-treatment-of-anxiety-0b1ecXH1jk

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
British Medical Journal
ISSN
0007-1447
eISSN
1468-5833
DOI
10.1136/bmj.2.5707.446
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Forty-eight patients with anxiety states were treated with oxazepam (Serenid-D), which was administered in tablets of three different colours—red, yellow, and green. Every patient received one week's treatment with each colour, according to a random programme. A latin square design was used to ensure complete balance between the colours and between the weeks. The patients' symptoms were categorized and then assessed by both weekly physicians' ratings and daily self-rating, which showed close agreement. Colour preference was shown on both these scales in that symptoms of anxiety were most improved with green, whereas depressive symptoms appeared to respond best to yellow. Such colour preferences, however, did not reach levels of statistical significance, except for phobias as rated on the physicians' assessment. The results indicate that colour may play a part in the response to a drug.

Journal

British Medical JournalBritish Medical Journal

Published: May 23, 1970

There are no references for this article.