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Relationship between fibroblast growth factor 21 and thyroid stimulating hormone in healthy subjects without components of metabolic syndrome

Relationship between fibroblast growth factor 21 and thyroid stimulating hormone in healthy... ObjectiveTo determine the relationship between human fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by testing the level of FGF21, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism-related indices, as well as the level of TSH, among metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results.MethodsAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to test the levels of serum FGF21 and free fatty acids (FFA) in metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results, and electrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) was used to measure TSH, thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAbs), and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels.ResultsThree hundred fifty-six metabolic syndrome-free patients (116 males and 240 females; average age, 43±13 years) with normal physical examination results were enrolled. Among the patients with normal physical examination results, FGF21 had a weak relationship with obesity indices, such as the waist circumference (r=0.110, P=0.038), the waist-to-hip ratio (r=0.119, P=0.025), and the triglycerides level (TG; r=0.302, P=0.000), and a weak relationship with blood lipid levels, such as total cholesterol (TCHO; r=0.113, P=0.012) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C; r=0.175, P=0.001), but no relationship with TSH (r=–0.023, P=0.666). In addition, the FGF21 levels in thyroid autoantibody-positive and -negative groups were not significantly different.ConclusionAmong the metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results, FGF21 has no apparent relationship with TSH or thyroid autoimmunity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Family Medicine and Community Health British Medical Journal

Relationship between fibroblast growth factor 21 and thyroid stimulating hormone in healthy subjects without components of metabolic syndrome

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Relationship between fibroblast growth factor 21 and thyroid stimulating hormone in healthy subjects without components of metabolic syndrome

Family Medicine and Community Health , Volume 2 (3) – Sep 1, 2014

Abstract

ObjectiveTo determine the relationship between human fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by testing the level of FGF21, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism-related indices, as well as the level of TSH, among metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results.MethodsAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to test the levels of serum FGF21 and free fatty acids (FFA) in metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results, and electrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) was used to measure TSH, thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAbs), and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels.ResultsThree hundred fifty-six metabolic syndrome-free patients (116 males and 240 females; average age, 43±13 years) with normal physical examination results were enrolled. Among the patients with normal physical examination results, FGF21 had a weak relationship with obesity indices, such as the waist circumference (r=0.110, P=0.038), the waist-to-hip ratio (r=0.119, P=0.025), and the triglycerides level (TG; r=0.302, P=0.000), and a weak relationship with blood lipid levels, such as total cholesterol (TCHO; r=0.113, P=0.012) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C; r=0.175, P=0.001), but no relationship with TSH (r=–0.023, P=0.666). In addition, the FGF21 levels in thyroid autoantibody-positive and -negative groups were not significantly different.ConclusionAmong the metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results, FGF21 has no apparent relationship with TSH or thyroid autoimmunity.

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Publisher
British Medical Journal
Copyright
© 2014 Family Medicine and Community Health
ISSN
2305-6983
eISSN
2009-8774
DOI
10.15212/FMCH.2014.0118
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ObjectiveTo determine the relationship between human fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by testing the level of FGF21, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism-related indices, as well as the level of TSH, among metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results.MethodsAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to test the levels of serum FGF21 and free fatty acids (FFA) in metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results, and electrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) was used to measure TSH, thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAbs), and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels.ResultsThree hundred fifty-six metabolic syndrome-free patients (116 males and 240 females; average age, 43±13 years) with normal physical examination results were enrolled. Among the patients with normal physical examination results, FGF21 had a weak relationship with obesity indices, such as the waist circumference (r=0.110, P=0.038), the waist-to-hip ratio (r=0.119, P=0.025), and the triglycerides level (TG; r=0.302, P=0.000), and a weak relationship with blood lipid levels, such as total cholesterol (TCHO; r=0.113, P=0.012) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C; r=0.175, P=0.001), but no relationship with TSH (r=–0.023, P=0.666). In addition, the FGF21 levels in thyroid autoantibody-positive and -negative groups were not significantly different.ConclusionAmong the metabolic syndrome-free patients with normal physical examination results, FGF21 has no apparent relationship with TSH or thyroid autoimmunity.

Journal

Family Medicine and Community HealthBritish Medical Journal

Published: Sep 1, 2014

Keywords: Human fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21)Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)AutoimmunityFree fatty acids (FFA)

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