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Wind Energy and Adverse Visual-Impact Litigation: A Balance of Global and Local Interests?

Wind Energy and Adverse Visual-Impact Litigation: A Balance of Global and Local Interests? Wind energy is one of the world’s fastest growing forms of energy. It has many advantages over traditional forms of energy. However, visual impact is a disadvantage. Although planning applications for wind-farm developments are on the rise worldwide, the visual impact of potential developments repeatedly provokes opposition to new wind-farm projects. Litigation aimed at enjoining the construction of wind-energy facilities can slow wind-energy development and increase its cost. This article takes a comparative approach to such visual-impact litigation, looking at cases from Australia, New Zealand, and England in order to understand why planning cases are much more likely to succeed in some jurisdictions than others. I argue that in some jurisdictions decision-makers and courts are impliedly prioritizing the global, national, and local interests in favour of wind-farm development over the national and local interests in favour of landscape and visual-amenity protection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

Wind Energy and Adverse Visual-Impact Litigation: A Balance of Global and Local Interests?

Climate Law , Volume 6 (3-4): 336 – Oct 11, 2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2016 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Articles
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00603008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wind energy is one of the world’s fastest growing forms of energy. It has many advantages over traditional forms of energy. However, visual impact is a disadvantage. Although planning applications for wind-farm developments are on the rise worldwide, the visual impact of potential developments repeatedly provokes opposition to new wind-farm projects. Litigation aimed at enjoining the construction of wind-energy facilities can slow wind-energy development and increase its cost. This article takes a comparative approach to such visual-impact litigation, looking at cases from Australia, New Zealand, and England in order to understand why planning cases are much more likely to succeed in some jurisdictions than others. I argue that in some jurisdictions decision-makers and courts are impliedly prioritizing the global, national, and local interests in favour of wind-farm development over the national and local interests in favour of landscape and visual-amenity protection.

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: Oct 11, 2016

Keywords: Renewable energy; wind energy; energy policy; planning litigation

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