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Traditions céramiques, identités et peuplement en Sénégambie: Ethnographie comparée et essai de reconstitution historique . By Moustapha Sall . Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 63, BAR International Series 1407, Oxford, 2005, 158 pp. ISBN 1-84171-850-5. Price £ 30.00.

Traditions céramiques, identités et peuplement en Sénégambie: Ethnographie comparée et essai de... BOOK REVIEW Traditions céramiques, identités et peuplement en Sénégambie: Ethnographie comparée et essai de reconstitution historique. By Moustapha Sall. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 63, BAR International Series 1407, Oxford, 2005, 158 pp. ISBN 1-84171-850-5. Price £ 30.00. In this ethno-archaeological study, archaeologist Moustapha Sall investigates modern ceramic traditions in western Gambia and central-west/south-west Senegal. His study aims to investigate the relationship between variations in pottery and pottery manufacturing techniques on the one hand, and the ethno-linguistic and social identities and histories of modern cultural groups on the other. His larger goal is to be able to apply the underlying principles about these relationships revealed by the study to understanding archaeological ceramic traditions and the social histories of their makers and users in the region. Sall writes that archaeology in the Senegambia has long seen considerable mapping of modern ethnonyms onto the archaeological vestiges of ancient populations, and through this project he sought to address critically the problems and potential of such assumptions. Sall conducted fieldwork on potters between 1996 and 1998, interviewing two hundred and thirty-eight Serrer, Wolof, Soocé, and Joola potters in some forty villages. His methodology was structured largely by questionnaires developed in the context http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

Traditions céramiques, identités et peuplement en Sénégambie: Ethnographie comparée et essai de reconstitution historique . By Moustapha Sall . Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 63, BAR International Series 1407, Oxford, 2005, 158 pp. ISBN 1-84171-850-5. Price £ 30.00.

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 5 (1): 149 – Oct 25, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2007 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEW Traditions céramiques, identités et peuplement en Sénégambie: Ethnographie comparée et essai de reconstitution historique. By Moustapha Sall. Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 63, BAR International Series 1407, Oxford, 2005, 158 pp. ISBN 1-84171-850-5. Price £ 30.00. In this ethno-archaeological study, archaeologist Moustapha Sall investigates modern ceramic traditions in western Gambia and central-west/south-west Senegal. His study aims to investigate the relationship between variations in pottery and pottery manufacturing techniques on the one hand, and the ethno-linguistic and social identities and histories of modern cultural groups on the other. His larger goal is to be able to apply the underlying principles about these relationships revealed by the study to understanding archaeological ceramic traditions and the social histories of their makers and users in the region. Sall writes that archaeology in the Senegambia has long seen considerable mapping of modern ethnonyms onto the archaeological vestiges of ancient populations, and through this project he sought to address critically the problems and potential of such assumptions. Sall conducted fieldwork on potters between 1996 and 1998, interviewing two hundred and thirty-eight Serrer, Wolof, Soocé, and Joola potters in some forty villages. His methodology was structured largely by questionnaires developed in the context

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2007

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