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Traditional China in Asian and World History

Traditional China in Asian and World History BOOK REVIEWS | 319 scribe Java as part of Bali (p. 433), and c) describe Stalin being a po- litical despot due to his “Asian/Georgian background” (p. 424). It is clearly alarming that such scholarship has had positive reviews. Duchesne is free to make his arguments but must substan- tiate the same with rigour. By Tansen SEN and Victor H. MAIR Ann Arbor: Association for Asian Studies, Inc., 2012. xxi + 108 pp. ISBN: 978-0924304651 (Paperback) Reviewed by Hang LIN University of Wü rzburg, Wü rzburg, Germany doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12773/arwh.2013.1.2.319 There has been a long mistaken stereotype of an “isolated China” in its long history among historians of China. In recent years, however, some scholars begin to challenge the conventional perception that Chinese civilization, in particular in its early phase, existed with no or only little influence from other parts of the world (Sanping Chen, Multicultural China in Early Middle Ages. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012 and Jonathan Karam Skaff, Sui-Tang China and Its Turko-Mongol Neighbors: Cul- ture, Power, and Connections, 580-800. New York: Oxford Universi- ty Press, 2012). In Traditional China in Asian and World History, Tansen Sen and Victor H. Mair offer a radically revised view of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Review of World Histories Brill

Traditional China in Asian and World History

Asian Review of World Histories , Volume 1 (2): 5 – Jun 29, 2013

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2287-965X
eISSN
2287-9811
DOI
10.12773/arwh.2013.1.2.319
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS | 319 scribe Java as part of Bali (p. 433), and c) describe Stalin being a po- litical despot due to his “Asian/Georgian background” (p. 424). It is clearly alarming that such scholarship has had positive reviews. Duchesne is free to make his arguments but must substan- tiate the same with rigour. By Tansen SEN and Victor H. MAIR Ann Arbor: Association for Asian Studies, Inc., 2012. xxi + 108 pp. ISBN: 978-0924304651 (Paperback) Reviewed by Hang LIN University of Wü rzburg, Wü rzburg, Germany doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12773/arwh.2013.1.2.319 There has been a long mistaken stereotype of an “isolated China” in its long history among historians of China. In recent years, however, some scholars begin to challenge the conventional perception that Chinese civilization, in particular in its early phase, existed with no or only little influence from other parts of the world (Sanping Chen, Multicultural China in Early Middle Ages. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012 and Jonathan Karam Skaff, Sui-Tang China and Its Turko-Mongol Neighbors: Cul- ture, Power, and Connections, 580-800. New York: Oxford Universi- ty Press, 2012). In Traditional China in Asian and World History, Tansen Sen and Victor H. Mair offer a radically revised view of

Journal

Asian Review of World HistoriesBrill

Published: Jun 29, 2013

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