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TOWARD A SYSTEMATIC BEAD DESCRIPTION SYSTEM: A VIEW FROM THE LOWER FALEMME, SENEGAL

TOWARD A SYSTEMATIC BEAD DESCRIPTION SYSTEM: A VIEW FROM THE LOWER FALEMME, SENEGAL This study examines a glass bead assemblage from surveyed and excavated portions of the Falemme (Senegal) to present a classification system for the analysis of archaeological beads in Africa and beyond. Although bead classification poses special problems, it is argued that such analysis is worthwhile, as beads may shed light on the dynamics of production, exchange and consumption in the past, on processes of culture change and continuity, and, most particularly, on chronological assessment. Focusing on the latter, the typological analysis helped us extract diagnostic information from the 474 mainly European-made beads, which complements and nicely supports the temporal sequence derived from imported trade materials and local ceramics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

TOWARD A SYSTEMATIC BEAD DESCRIPTION SYSTEM: A VIEW FROM THE LOWER FALEMME, SENEGAL

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2003 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines a glass bead assemblage from surveyed and excavated portions of the Falemme (Senegal) to present a classification system for the analysis of archaeological beads in Africa and beyond. Although bead classification poses special problems, it is argued that such analysis is worthwhile, as beads may shed light on the dynamics of production, exchange and consumption in the past, on processes of culture change and continuity, and, most particularly, on chronological assessment. Focusing on the latter, the typological analysis helped us extract diagnostic information from the 474 mainly European-made beads, which complements and nicely supports the temporal sequence derived from imported trade materials and local ceramics.

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2003

Keywords: beads; Senegal; trade; typology; methodology

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