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Three Monsters at Tillya Tepe

Three Monsters at Tillya Tepe THREE MONSTERS AT TILLYA TEPE JOHN BOARDMAN The golden hoard from the 1st century AD graves at Tillya Tepe has been known to scholars for nearly twenty years now, thanks to Victor Sarianidi’s Ž ne publication. 1 There has been much further comment on the iconography of the Ž nds and of their cultural associations. 2 The evidence is in the objects themselves and not any texts, and the objects are not all that easy to see and therefore understand, even in the excellent enlarged photographs which have been published. Drawing may help towards understanding, despite the obvious danger of wrong interpretation en route, but it does offer the possibility of con ation of versions of subjects whose state of preservation may differ in details, and it avoids the distractions of colour and re ected light, and of confusion with adjacent ornament and Ž gures. It also facilitates comparisons. This paper explores three subjects only out of many, some of which I shall deal with elsewhere, based especially on the drawing of several of the objects, and on as wide as possible a search for kin and comparanda, from Greece to China. They will be found to lead http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

Three Monsters at Tillya Tepe

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia , Volume 9 (1-2): 133 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2003 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/157005703322114865
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THREE MONSTERS AT TILLYA TEPE JOHN BOARDMAN The golden hoard from the 1st century AD graves at Tillya Tepe has been known to scholars for nearly twenty years now, thanks to Victor Sarianidi’s Ž ne publication. 1 There has been much further comment on the iconography of the Ž nds and of their cultural associations. 2 The evidence is in the objects themselves and not any texts, and the objects are not all that easy to see and therefore understand, even in the excellent enlarged photographs which have been published. Drawing may help towards understanding, despite the obvious danger of wrong interpretation en route, but it does offer the possibility of con ation of versions of subjects whose state of preservation may differ in details, and it avoids the distractions of colour and re ected light, and of confusion with adjacent ornament and Ž gures. It also facilitates comparisons. This paper explores three subjects only out of many, some of which I shall deal with elsewhere, based especially on the drawing of several of the objects, and on as wide as possible a search for kin and comparanda, from Greece to China. They will be found to lead

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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