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The Sato Cabinet and the Making of Japan's Non-Nuclear Policy

The Sato Cabinet and the Making of Japan's Non-Nuclear Policy 25 The Sato \ Cabinet and the Making of Japan’s Non-Nuclear Policy Kusunoki Ayako Osaka University Most countries after World War II found it challenging to deal with nuclear forces in national security policy on the one hand and to cooper- ate with measures aimed at international disarmament and control of such destructive weapons, on the other. Japan, the only country to expe- rience atomic bombing, was no exception to this generalization. During the Cold War, the Japanese government tried to satisfy two conflicting imperatives: keeping the nation safe from the nuclear threats posed by the Soviet Union and China; and pursuing the eventual abolition of nuclear weapons. The Sato \ Eisaku Cabinet (1964–72) formulated Japan’s nuclear policy in the late 1960s, when an international nuclear nonproliferation frame- work was being built, and the bipolar world system was becoming more multipolar. At the same time, Tokyo began to revaluate the security policy it had established in the early 1950s, one which allowed Japan to pay a relatively small cost for the U.S. military presence in and around Japan. In this context, Sato \ chose not to go nuclear and opted to depend on American extended deterrence, while cooperating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American-East Asian Relations Brill

The Sato Cabinet and the Making of Japan's Non-Nuclear Policy

Journal of American-East Asian Relations , Volume 15 (1-2): 25 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1058-3947
eISSN
1876-5610
DOI
10.1163/187656108793645806
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

25 The Sato \ Cabinet and the Making of Japan’s Non-Nuclear Policy Kusunoki Ayako Osaka University Most countries after World War II found it challenging to deal with nuclear forces in national security policy on the one hand and to cooper- ate with measures aimed at international disarmament and control of such destructive weapons, on the other. Japan, the only country to expe- rience atomic bombing, was no exception to this generalization. During the Cold War, the Japanese government tried to satisfy two conflicting imperatives: keeping the nation safe from the nuclear threats posed by the Soviet Union and China; and pursuing the eventual abolition of nuclear weapons. The Sato \ Eisaku Cabinet (1964–72) formulated Japan’s nuclear policy in the late 1960s, when an international nuclear nonproliferation frame- work was being built, and the bipolar world system was becoming more multipolar. At the same time, Tokyo began to revaluate the security policy it had established in the early 1950s, one which allowed Japan to pay a relatively small cost for the U.S. military presence in and around Japan. In this context, Sato \ chose not to go nuclear and opted to depend on American extended deterrence, while cooperating

Journal

Journal of American-East Asian RelationsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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