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The pragmatics of social media

The pragmatics of social media The study of pragmatics has changed greatly in recent years. Long-established studies on face-to-face communication and the cooperative principle in conversation have now been supplanted by studies of communication involving different modes, different styles and even different communicative avenues. Online chats, live communication, Internet responses, multimodal interaction, social media conversations, and even chatting with machines have now become trendy analytical subjects. This situation became more intensified after many countries implemented movement control of their citizens during the COVID-19 pandemic. Social media, in all forms, have become an important tool for interaction with friends and people online. The pragmatics of social media is sometimes quite similar to the pragmatics of face-to-face communication, yet at other times it can indeed be very different.According to Boyd and Ellison (2008), social media are semi-public communication platforms where people create friend lists and mutually agree to read each other’s information. The accessibility of social media allows ordinary people to create content, making user-generated content (UGC, see Bruns, 2008; Burgess, 2012) a new kind of genre on these platforms. The rapid generation and large number of UGC texts have presented a certain level of difficulty in research, defining the starting point of many studies within http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Pragmatics Brill

The pragmatics of social media

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1877-3095
eISSN
1877-3109
DOI
10.1163/18773109-01502001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study of pragmatics has changed greatly in recent years. Long-established studies on face-to-face communication and the cooperative principle in conversation have now been supplanted by studies of communication involving different modes, different styles and even different communicative avenues. Online chats, live communication, Internet responses, multimodal interaction, social media conversations, and even chatting with machines have now become trendy analytical subjects. This situation became more intensified after many countries implemented movement control of their citizens during the COVID-19 pandemic. Social media, in all forms, have become an important tool for interaction with friends and people online. The pragmatics of social media is sometimes quite similar to the pragmatics of face-to-face communication, yet at other times it can indeed be very different.According to Boyd and Ellison (2008), social media are semi-public communication platforms where people create friend lists and mutually agree to read each other’s information. The accessibility of social media allows ordinary people to create content, making user-generated content (UGC, see Bruns, 2008; Burgess, 2012) a new kind of genre on these platforms. The rapid generation and large number of UGC texts have presented a certain level of difficulty in research, defining the starting point of many studies within

Journal

International Review of PragmaticsBrill

Published: Jul 11, 2023

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