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The Paris Climate Change Agreement: China and India

The Paris Climate Change Agreement: China and India This paper assesses how the Paris Agreement on climate change affects China and India. Taking a twail (third-world approaches to international law) approach, it argues that patterns of exploitation are repeated in different fields. The unfccc required developed countries to reduce their emissions before developing countries would be required to do so. While some developed countries are keeping to their side of the bargain, others are failing to do so. Nevertheless, China and India have accepted an agreement with targets for all countries which requires considerable sacrifices in the energy field but possible gains in the water field. While both countries have agreed to reduce the rate of growth of their emissions, they have high expectations of climate finance, which are unlikely to be fulfilled. Their commitments require major changes to national policy, scarcely the sort of tinkering that the no-regrets policy in India has achieved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Climate Law Brill

The Paris Climate Change Agreement: China and India

Climate Law , Volume 6 (1-2): 171 – May 6, 2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2016 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Paris Agreement Articles
ISSN
1878-6553
eISSN
1878-6561
DOI
10.1163/18786561-00601012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper assesses how the Paris Agreement on climate change affects China and India. Taking a twail (third-world approaches to international law) approach, it argues that patterns of exploitation are repeated in different fields. The unfccc required developed countries to reduce their emissions before developing countries would be required to do so. While some developed countries are keeping to their side of the bargain, others are failing to do so. Nevertheless, China and India have accepted an agreement with targets for all countries which requires considerable sacrifices in the energy field but possible gains in the water field. While both countries have agreed to reduce the rate of growth of their emissions, they have high expectations of climate finance, which are unlikely to be fulfilled. Their commitments require major changes to national policy, scarcely the sort of tinkering that the no-regrets policy in India has achieved.

Journal

Climate LawBrill

Published: May 6, 2016

Keywords: Paris Agreement; Climate Change; China; India

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