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The Heritage of Imperial Aramaic in Eastern Aramaic

The Heritage of Imperial Aramaic in Eastern Aramaic <jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Based on certain linguistic features, the varieties of Aramaic attested after the Persian period are usually divided into a Western and an Eastern branch. It is, however, less easy to pinpoint the origin of these two branches, since already the first textual witnesses of Aramaic exhibit a considerable amount of variation. This paper attempts to reconsider some traits often associated with Eastern Aramaic (less clearly defined than its Western counterpart) from a diachronic point of view and relates them to the distinctive features of Imperial Aramaic. Whereas some of them clearly antedate the fall of the Persian Empire, many others reflect later developments.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aramaic Studies Brill

The Heritage of Imperial Aramaic in Eastern Aramaic

Aramaic Studies , Volume 6 (1): 85 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1477-8351
eISSN
1745-5227
DOI
10.1163/147783508X371295
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Based on certain linguistic features, the varieties of Aramaic attested after the Persian period are usually divided into a Western and an Eastern branch. It is, however, less easy to pinpoint the origin of these two branches, since already the first textual witnesses of Aramaic exhibit a considerable amount of variation. This paper attempts to reconsider some traits often associated with Eastern Aramaic (less clearly defined than its Western counterpart) from a diachronic point of view and relates them to the distinctive features of Imperial Aramaic. Whereas some of them clearly antedate the fall of the Persian Empire, many others reflect later developments.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

Aramaic StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: HISTORICAL-COMPARATIVE GRAMMAR OF ARAMAIC; EASTERN ARAMAIC; ARAMAIC DIALECTOLOGY; IMPERIAL/OFFICIAL ARAMAIC; LINGUISTIC CLASSIFICATION

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