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THE CULT OF THE DOUBLE-EDGED AXE IN THE NORTHERN CAUCASUS

THE CULT OF THE DOUBLE-EDGED AXE IN THE NORTHERN CAUCASUS THE CULT OF THE DOUBLE-EDGED AXE IN THE NORTHERN CAUCASUS * ALEXANDER MOSHINSKY In the collections of the State Historical Museum (Moscow) there are 13 bronze plates from burial grounds in the Digorsky Gorge in Southern Ossetia near the villages of Galiat and Kumbulta. Eleven of them are from the Faskau burial-ground at Galiat and two (probably) from the Verkhnyaya Rutkha burial- ground at the village of Kumbulta, where they were acquired. All the plates are lacking precise provenance details, since they were bought at the above- mentioned locations at the end of the 19 th century by A.S. Uvarov, P.S. Uvarova and V.I. Dolbezhev, mainly from a local inhabitant B. Dzelikhov, who had plundered the sites in question. Similar plates are known to have been found in the Bril burial-ground at Racha in Georgia. 1 It is important to note that in his day A.A. Iessen had already linked Digoria and Racha of the Middle Bronze Age as belonging to a single area, despite the fact that they are located on different sides of the Greater Caucasus range. 2 The plates were traditionally interpreted as depictions of a bird with wings spread  at and with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

THE CULT OF THE DOUBLE-EDGED AXE IN THE NORTHERN CAUCASUS

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
DOI
10.1163/157005701753359831
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE CULT OF THE DOUBLE-EDGED AXE IN THE NORTHERN CAUCASUS * ALEXANDER MOSHINSKY In the collections of the State Historical Museum (Moscow) there are 13 bronze plates from burial grounds in the Digorsky Gorge in Southern Ossetia near the villages of Galiat and Kumbulta. Eleven of them are from the Faskau burial-ground at Galiat and two (probably) from the Verkhnyaya Rutkha burial- ground at the village of Kumbulta, where they were acquired. All the plates are lacking precise provenance details, since they were bought at the above- mentioned locations at the end of the 19 th century by A.S. Uvarov, P.S. Uvarova and V.I. Dolbezhev, mainly from a local inhabitant B. Dzelikhov, who had plundered the sites in question. Similar plates are known to have been found in the Bril burial-ground at Racha in Georgia. 1 It is important to note that in his day A.A. Iessen had already linked Digoria and Racha of the Middle Bronze Age as belonging to a single area, despite the fact that they are located on different sides of the Greater Caucasus range. 2 The plates were traditionally interpreted as depictions of a bird with wings spread  at and with the

Journal

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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