Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie, written by Joseph A. Fry

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie, written by... (Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 2015). 456 pp. $40.00 (cloth).To paraphrase C. Vann Woodward, in a time when transnationalism sweeps everything else before it, as it does at present, the regional historian is likely to be oppressed by a sense of their unimportance. And yet, Joseph A. Fry offers a convincing regional explanation for the Vietnam War’s escalation and duration. In doing so, he adds needed insights into a larger national and international story as well as contemporary American politics. As Fry argues, history starts at home; local forces mold individuals. Local and state politics, the politics of place, can reinforce these views. Widening the lens, regional historians perceive groups of shared political and economic interests, ideology, and culture, along with antagonisms toward other regions. Fry maintains that regionalism enables a better understanding of the “internal determinants” of u.s. foreign relations, and in this case, the Vietnam War (p. 7).To be sure, Fry has chosen in the American South—the eleven states of the Confederacy plus Kentucky—the ideal region. The book’s first chapter offers a valuable primer on this region from 1789 to 1973 developing his arguments that Southerners long have seen themselves as unique and accordingly have developed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American-East Asian Relations Brill

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie, written by Joseph A. Fry

Journal of American-East Asian Relations , Volume 25 (1): 3 – Mar 15, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/the-american-south-and-the-vietnam-war-belligerence-protest-and-agony-4U13uoj0mx
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1058-3947
eISSN
1876-5610
DOI
10.1163/18765610-02501007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

(Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 2015). 456 pp. $40.00 (cloth).To paraphrase C. Vann Woodward, in a time when transnationalism sweeps everything else before it, as it does at present, the regional historian is likely to be oppressed by a sense of their unimportance. And yet, Joseph A. Fry offers a convincing regional explanation for the Vietnam War’s escalation and duration. In doing so, he adds needed insights into a larger national and international story as well as contemporary American politics. As Fry argues, history starts at home; local forces mold individuals. Local and state politics, the politics of place, can reinforce these views. Widening the lens, regional historians perceive groups of shared political and economic interests, ideology, and culture, along with antagonisms toward other regions. Fry maintains that regionalism enables a better understanding of the “internal determinants” of u.s. foreign relations, and in this case, the Vietnam War (p. 7).To be sure, Fry has chosen in the American South—the eleven states of the Confederacy plus Kentucky—the ideal region. The book’s first chapter offers a valuable primer on this region from 1789 to 1973 developing his arguments that Southerners long have seen themselves as unique and accordingly have developed

Journal

Journal of American-East Asian RelationsBrill

Published: Mar 15, 2018

There are no references for this article.