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Tea Party Toys? Classical Kisalian Grave Goods from the Upemba (D.R. Congo)

Tea Party Toys? Classical Kisalian Grave Goods from the Upemba (D.R. Congo) The continuous Iron Age sequence that connects the 10 th century Kisalian in central Africa to the present day inhabitants of the area, the Luba, provides a rare opportunity to link archaeological data to ethnographic observations. Numerous Kisalian graves reflect the elaborate rituals and beliefs and the complex socioeconomic organization of that period. One of its intriguing aspects is the extensive use of various miniature objects as grave goods, for children and adults. The widespread Luba practice of making miniature objects for their children, as well as in connection with the spiritual world, is thus likely to date back many centuries and testifies to the symbolic qualities of miniatures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

Tea Party Toys? Classical Kisalian Grave Goods from the Upemba (D.R. Congo)

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 14 (1): 19 – Nov 1, 2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2016 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/2191-5784-10279
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The continuous Iron Age sequence that connects the 10 th century Kisalian in central Africa to the present day inhabitants of the area, the Luba, provides a rare opportunity to link archaeological data to ethnographic observations. Numerous Kisalian graves reflect the elaborate rituals and beliefs and the complex socioeconomic organization of that period. One of its intriguing aspects is the extensive use of various miniature objects as grave goods, for children and adults. The widespread Luba practice of making miniature objects for their children, as well as in connection with the spiritual world, is thus likely to date back many centuries and testifies to the symbolic qualities of miniatures.

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Nov 1, 2016

Keywords: miniatures; childhood; RDCongo; grave goods

There are no references for this article.